Sync settings in Windows 8: Personalizaion, Language Settings, Ease Of Access


Synchronizing personal data between PC’s and different mobile devices is an easy task in Windows 8

 

 

 

It is one of the most frequently asked questions among people who are using Windows 8, how do I sync settings?

It’s not so difficult so synchronize settings but since it has a totally new look, it is difficult to find the options. Syncing settings saves you a lot of precious time if you want to save your data on different mobile devices and PCs. Here is how to do it:

1. Press the Windows Hot Key and click Desktop.

 

2. Once you are at Desktop, Press the Windows Hot Key + I. You will get a sidebar like this.

 

3. Navigate and click More PC Settings button on the bottom of the side bar and the following screen will be shown to youHere, navigate and click the Sync your settings tab from the left side. You will have to scroll down to find that. Now, you can expect to see the following screen:\\

 

4. Under the heading of Settings to sync, you can easily select which settings you intend to sync. The settings are further classified into sub headings. Before you could enable anything, you will have to drag the bar on the side of sync settings on this pc to the right side. This would enable you all the options below. Your sync settings have noe been turned on.

 

 

Conclusion

Syncing settings allow users to save precious time in shifting data and settings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Add Shutdown and Reboot to the Windows 8 Win+X Menu


Add Shutdown and Reboot to the Windows 8 Win+X Menu

By : Shan M Saleem

 

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Shutting down and restarting your computer should both be easy tasks, right? Well, in Windows 8, these tasks are not straightforward. However, there are easier ways of shutting down and restarting your Windows 8 computer.

We’ve showed you before how to shut down or restart your Windows 8 computer and how to add shut down, restart, and sleep shortcuts to the Windows 8 Metro Start screen.

Recently, we wrote about the new Win+X menu in Windows 8 and showed you how to add items to it manually and using a free tool. The Win+X menu has many useful commands and system utilities and seems to be the perfect place to put shortcuts for shutting down and restarting your computer. We will show you how to add shut down and restart shortcuts to the Win+X menu.

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First, you need to create shortcuts for the Shut Down and Restart commands. To do this, see our article about adding shut down and restart shortcuts to the Windows 8 Metro Start screen.

Once you have your shortcuts, modify the shortcut files and add them to the Win+X Menu manually or use the Win+X Menu Editor to add them to the Win+X menu.

We decided to put the shortcuts in their own new group so they are separated from the rest of the options on the Win+X menu.

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Once you have manually restarted Windows Explorer or applied the changes in the Win+X Menu Editor, the Restart and Shut Down commands are available on the Win+X menu.

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Remember that the Windows 8 was designed with tablets, like the iPad, in mind, so it has a different concept about certain features. You generally don’t shut down tablets completely. They just go into low power mode when you press the power button. That’s why the shut down feature is hidden. It’s not meant to be used a lot. However, adding shut down and restart shortcuts to the Win+X menu, or the Start screen, makes it easier for those of us using desktop computers or laptops we shut down to transport often.

 

 

 

 

Three Different Styles Of Windows 8, Windows 8 Pro and Windows RT


We’ve known for what feels like ages that Windows 8 would come in at least two flavors: one supporting x86 devices and one for ARM machines. Now Microsoft’s ready to put a naming scheme on its much-anticipated menu for the operating system. According to a post on the Windows blog, ARM devices will get Windows RT, while x86 / 64 devices will run Windows 8 and Windows 8 Pro (also for x86 devices) will offer the suit-and-tie set added features for “encryption, virtualization, PC management and domain connectivity.” Windows Media Center will be packaged as an add-on for the folks who go Pro. For a full break down of what each version will hold hit the source link below and check out our hands-on impressions of the OS preview here.

 

 

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Here’s How Windows 8 Will Create a Singular User Experience Across Different Screen Sizes


 

Microsoft has been adamant that design is central to the development of Windows 8, and early builds have proven that to be true. But so far, we’ve only really seen Windows 8 on a couple devices, and Microsoft promises the Metro experience will be uniform regardless of screen size or form factor. But how?

In yet another sprawling MSDN essay written by UX program manager, David Washington, there are three areas that will prove key in Microsoft’s quest to accomplish this feat: adaptive layout frameworks, auto-scaling varying pixel densities, and support for scalable vector graphics.

Adaptive Layouts

Microsoft’s use of CSS3 and XAML, which will allow developers to section off apps into pre-defined modules which can be rearranged on the fly. This will ensure that content will fit on a screen that’s 1024 pixels wide, or 2560 pixels wide. This also means app developers will need to consider these factors from the first moment they start working on an app.

Pixel Density Auto-Scaling

When you increase pixel density, things become very small on the screen unless you magnify it a little bit. Instead of offering more screen real-estate, on-screen assets instead become higher-fidelity. Microsoft is able to accomplish this on different screen sizes and resolutions by lumping displays into three categories—standard, HD, and quad-XGA—and establishing scale factors.

Many Windows 8 tablet PCs will have pixel densities of at least 135 DPI – much higher than many of us are used to. Of course we’ve seen the introduction of HD tablets with Full HD 1920×1080 resolution on an 11.6″ screen, with a pixel density of 190 DPI or quad-XGA tablets with 2560×1440 on the same 11.6″ screen; that’s a pixel density of 253 DPI. Pixel densities can increase even more on lesser aspect ratios and smaller screens as we see in the new iPad. As the pixel density increases, the physical size of objects on screen gets smaller. If Windows wasn’t built to accommodate different pixel densities, objects on screen would be too small to easily tap or read on these tablets.

For those who buy these higher pixel-density screens, we want to ensure that their apps, text, and images will look both beautiful and usable on these devices. Early on, we explored continuous scaling to the pixel density, which would maintain the size of an object in inches, but we found that most apps use bitmap images, which could look blurry when scaled up or down to an unpredictable size. Instead, Windows 8 uses predictable scale percentages to ensure that Windows will look great on these devices. There are three scale percentages in Windows 8:

100% when no scaling is applied
140% for HD tablets
180% for quad-XGA tablets

Scalable Vector Graphics

Native support for scalable vector graphics will make it easy for developers to create assets that can adjust on-the-fly to varying resolutions and pixel densities without any additional coding from developers. If a developer doesn’t want to mess with SVG files, they can also save multiple images of the same file for the app to call on depending on screen size, or use CSS3 commands, which will automatically resize a file. Either way, it ensures an app will look the same regardless of screen size.

All in all, Microsoft has some smart ideas at play here, and it will be interesting to see how developers embrace these when Windows 8 hits the masses at the end of the year. [Microsoft]

Here’s How Windows 8 Will Create a Singular User Experience Across Different Screen Sizes


 

Microsoft has been adamant that design is central to the development of Windows 8, and early builds have proven that to be true. But so far, we’ve only really seen Windows 8 on a couple devices, and Microsoft promises the Metro experience will be uniform regardless of screen size or form factor. But how?

In yet another sprawling MSDN essay written by UX program manager, David Washington, there are three areas that will prove key in Microsoft’s quest to accomplish this feat: adaptive layout frameworks, auto-scaling varying pixel densities, and support for scalable vector graphics.

Adaptive Layouts

Microsoft’s use of CSS3 and XAML, which will allow developers to section off apps into pre-defined modules which can be rearranged on the fly. This will ensure that content will fit on a screen that’s 1024 pixels wide, or 2560 pixels wide. This also means app developers will need to consider these factors from the first moment they start working on an app.

Pixel Density Auto-Scaling

When you increase pixel density, things become very small on the screen unless you magnify it a little bit. Instead of offering more screen real-estate, on-screen assets instead become higher-fidelity. Microsoft is able to accomplish this on different screen sizes and resolutions by lumping displays into three categories—standard, HD, and quad-XGA—and establishing scale factors.

Many Windows 8 tablet PCs will have pixel densities of at least 135 DPI – much higher than many of us are used to. Of course we’ve seen the introduction of HD tablets with Full HD 1920×1080 resolution on an 11.6″ screen, with a pixel density of 190 DPI or quad-XGA tablets with 2560×1440 on the same 11.6″ screen; that’s a pixel density of 253 DPI. Pixel densities can increase even more on lesser aspect ratios and smaller screens as we see in the new iPad. As the pixel density increases, the physical size of objects on screen gets smaller. If Windows wasn’t built to accommodate different pixel densities, objects on screen would be too small to easily tap or read on these tablets.

For those who buy these higher pixel-density screens, we want to ensure that their apps, text, and images will look both beautiful and usable on these devices. Early on, we explored continuous scaling to the pixel density, which would maintain the size of an object in inches, but we found that most apps use bitmap images, which could look blurry when scaled up or down to an unpredictable size. Instead, Windows 8 uses predictable scale percentages to ensure that Windows will look great on these devices. There are three scale percentages in Windows 8:

100% when no scaling is applied
140% for HD tablets
180% for quad-XGA tablets

Scalable Vector Graphics

Native support for scalable vector graphics will make it easy for developers to create assets that can adjust on-the-fly to varying resolutions and pixel densities without any additional coding from developers. If a developer doesn’t want to mess with SVG files, they can also save multiple images of the same file for the app to call on depending on screen size, or use CSS3 commands, which will automatically resize a file. Either way, it ensures an app will look the same regardless of screen size.

All in all, Microsoft has some smart ideas at play here, and it will be interesting to see how developers embrace these when Windows 8 hits the masses at the end of the year. [Microsoft]