Sync settings in Windows 8: Personalizaion, Language Settings, Ease Of Access


Synchronizing personal data between PC’s and different mobile devices is an easy task in Windows 8

 

 

 

It is one of the most frequently asked questions among people who are using Windows 8, how do I sync settings?

It’s not so difficult so synchronize settings but since it has a totally new look, it is difficult to find the options. Syncing settings saves you a lot of precious time if you want to save your data on different mobile devices and PCs. Here is how to do it:

1. Press the Windows Hot Key and click Desktop.

 

2. Once you are at Desktop, Press the Windows Hot Key + I. You will get a sidebar like this.

 

3. Navigate and click More PC Settings button on the bottom of the side bar and the following screen will be shown to youHere, navigate and click the Sync your settings tab from the left side. You will have to scroll down to find that. Now, you can expect to see the following screen:\\

 

4. Under the heading of Settings to sync, you can easily select which settings you intend to sync. The settings are further classified into sub headings. Before you could enable anything, you will have to drag the bar on the side of sync settings on this pc to the right side. This would enable you all the options below. Your sync settings have noe been turned on.

 

 

Conclusion

Syncing settings allow users to save precious time in shifting data and settings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Increase Text Size on Your WordPress Blog


Many people on the internet don’t really read… they skim. And maybe that is because our text size is too small and uncomfortable to read.

So, here’s a quick tutorial on how to increase text size. In wordpress, changing the font size is really easy. Just go to /wp-admin/theme-editor.php. Make sure you are on style.css.

Look for #content or #entry. Then, paste this code under there.

#content p {
font-size: 14px !important;
line-height:  24px !important;
margin: 1em 0 1.6em !important;}

If your theme addresses your content as #entry, be sure to change #content to #entry.

The #content p requests that all the paragraphs (p) in the blog post shall go with that styling. The 14px is the font size. 25px, line spacing.

!important is for telling that the rule should be applied always, even if another rule for the same element is present.

For example,

#content p {color: black}
#content p {color: green}

This CSS code makes your paragraphs green, because it appears later than ‘black’ – your browser applies the rule that appears at the bottom.

So if you want to make sure that your paragraphs are black, add a !important.

#content p {color: black !important}
#content p {color: green}

The margins determine the space between paragraphs.

1em = top margin | 0 = left & right margin | 1.6em = bottom margin.

Feel free to customize the codes to your liking!

Best Windows 8 Tips For Those Who Don’t Have Touch….


Long live the keyboard and mouse!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Windows 8 Release Preview download is out and available for all to install and, if you’re a regular here at Pocket-lint and of the non-Mac persuasion, it’s well worth doing. In fact, according to Microsoft, it’s even worth doing if you run a Mac.

Now, we’re not saying that Windows 8 is the best thing since sliced wafers. Indeed, according to our own Ian Morris, it’s more like the worst thing since fried Vista, but don’t let that put you off. What might be making you a little uncomfortable is the fact that you don’t have a touchscreen computer. No, most people don’t. Don’t worry. The trouble is, what with Windows 8 and that added Metro interface all built with touch in mind, being stuck with a mouse can be all too much of a drag.

Help is, very literally, at hand though. You have a keyboard and one that’s bursting with shortcuts, ready to get things done far quicker than either a touchscreen or a mouse could. Some are those that you might be familiar with from Windows 7 and some are entirely new, but here are a handful worth remembering to get you started on your journey of learning a new desktop OS.

Spacebar to unlock

There are a few different ways of getting through the lock screen but most of them involve dragging your mouse most of the way across your desk and off the other side if you’re not using a touch PC. Instead, save yourself the bother and a few broken coffee cups by thumping the spacebar instead. It’s also a wonderfully neolithic entrance to what is supposed to be a super-advanced piece of software.

Windows + L = Lock

You’ve unlocked with a swat of your palm, now lock back up again with hardly any more effort. As with the previous version of Windows, you’ll be relieved to see that a trusty Windows + L maneouvre will take you back to the lockscreen again. It certainly beats the mystery of trying to shut your machine down.

More spacebar

Hit the spacebar on the main view of the the Metro UI and you get something resembling a taskbar popping up at the bottom of the screen. It’s not really a taskbar but it does give you some controls over your live tiles which are worth customising as to your needs.

Windows + X = Start Menu

To be fair, it’s not really the Start Menu that you’ll know and love from Windows 7 but it’s as close a thing as you’re going to get. Looking more like the grey, right-click kind of options, you’ll find yourself presented with control panel options, links to programs, task managers, power managers, device information and more. You know, a bit like the Start Menu but with all of the style, design and, yes, life sucked out of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows + Q = Apps

Naturally all that verve and elan from the Start Menu had to be put somewhere. Hit the Windows key and Q to find some of it. What you’ll see is a massive, scrollable and very pretty Metro look at all the apps you’ve installed.

Windows + W = Search

The search function on the old Start Menu may have been fun but now Windows 8 is getting all contextual with search instead. Hit the Windows + W shortcut in any app or screen to bring up a search menu from the right where you can dig away to your heart’s content.

Windows + Z = Context

For even more contextual information, press Windows + Z at the same time. The effect is slightly different depending on which app you’re in at the time but expect tabs and address bars to pop up when browsing and other options from the top and bottom in other areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows + F4 = Close

You know this, or you certainly should. If there’s two Windows shortcuts that you ever picked up, this should be the second and, yes, it still works. More to the point, it’s more important than ever. Microsoft, in its infinite wisdom, has decided to dispense with that little X in the top right corner of windows that allows you to close them. In fairness, the idea is that the computer takes care of it all for you but, if you still find it unnerving that some bits and pieces might be open or running, then just hit that magic Windows + F4 combo to shut them down.

Windows + Tab = Fast Switching

Fast switching is your way to flick between open applications on Windows 8 and you can do that by either using Windows + Tab or Alt + Tab much like on Windows 7. The difference here is that the funky Aero look is lost, in the case of the former, and replaced with a dedicated bar that slides out of the left side of the screen. Fortunately, the Alt + Tab version is better on Windows 8 and cycles between full screen versions of your open applications very smoothly indeed.

Ctrl + Shift + Esc = Task Manager

Another classic from the Windows 7 days is the shortcut to the Task Manager that is Ctrl + Shift + Esc. It’s not always easy to find the familiar parts of an OS that you’re sure must exist when the UI has entirely changed, so it’s good to know that keyboard navigation will still do you proud.

Windows + E = Computer

Feeling like you’ve lost control? Fear not, the Windows + E shortcut still works to snap you straight into the Computer (or what used to be My Computer) window. From there, you’ll be able to get the usual proper picture of how much storage you’ve got left, what devices are plugged into your machine and a decent starting place for exploring your files. E is for explore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows + . = Cascade

One of the sexier look and feel touches of the Metro UI on Windows 8 is the cascade effect of the application windows. Pressing Windows + . allows you to switch around and cycle through a few of the looks which maximise and marginalise certain windows to present you with a different slant on multitasking.

Windows + H = Share

With social networking and the ever-popular sharing concept in technology, Microsoft has brought a direct sharing technique and shortcut to Windows 8 and the Metro UI. Hit Windows + H on a picture or other such file and a menu slides in from the right offering to share that item on whatever compatible service apps you have installed. Sadly, when we tried it, the only option we got was Mail. Nonetheless, the instant attachment and new message produced made things very quick and easy.

Windows + C = Charms

Another of the big push features and new terms of Windows 8 is the charms. Windows + C slides them in from the right where you can access the very fundamental areas that are Search, Settings, Devices, Sharing and Start. All very key bits and pieces.

Windows + , = Invisible

Aero isn’t completely dead. That little corner rectangle which offered a way of seeing through your applications all the way to the desktop is now repeated by hitting Windows + ,. It’s not wildly useful but it’s a nice way of sticking your head up above the clouds for a moment before diving back into your work.

Let us know in the comments of any non-touch treasures that you did up on your travels..

 

 

 

 

 

 

Must Follow PC Expert Tips To Prevent Computer Data Loss


We, as a computer user, must take the right steps to prevent computer data loss as data is of great importance to us.

A very good and real life quote that I find applicable in computer’s world is that Prevention Is Always Better than Cure. Rather than taking steps later to rectify a computer problem we should rather take steps that the need for rectification of fault doesn’t come. Makes more sense right? After all, we all can take some basic and not so difficult steps to ensure that the computer is used intelligently without causing harm to its data.

Data loss is the damage to data stored on a computer that results in the user not able to get access to it by normal means. Data can be stored by a user over a period of many years and may contain very critical and useful information. Loss of such critical and important data can mean loss of several thousand of user hours.

Thus computer data prevention is very important and critical to a personal home business user as well as a company. In order to not face a PC data loss situation or avoid such a scenario of computer data not available fully or accessible partially, you could take care to follow the following steps:

1. Use an Anti Virus Software And Regularly Update It

Antivirus software – better paid one than free, is designed to safeguard your PC from harm causing computer virus. Some virus infections can delete, modify your data secretly and lead to crash of your computer. So be sure to update your Antivirus software with the latest patch and signature files for maximum security.

Also, configure your antivirus to do regular scans of your computer drives at least once in a week when your computer is idle. Also, setup real time scanning so that virus are tracked via email and Internet etc.

2. Use A Good Quality UPS to Protect PC From Power Surges

An uninterruptible power supply protects your computer and data during a power surge or failure. A power surge (sudden high voltage) if allowed to enter a computer can cause storage devices and associated circuitry to malfunction leading to data loss.

The chargeable battery in the UPS gives you enough time to save your documents and shut down Windows properly so that you don’t lose any files or damage any hardware components of your computer due to sudden loss of electrical power.

3. Keep Your Computer in a Dry, Shaded And Dust-Free Area

Never operate your computer near places where it is directly exposed to rain, sun, humidity and dust. Such conditions can cause rusting and other problems to your PC hardware parts leading to loss of data.

4. Do Not Attempt To Repair or Open Up Your Computer Without Assistance If You Do Not Know Anything

If you try to attend to a computer fault by opening it without having computer hardware experience, you may damage the circuit boards, hardware components and worst of all, receive a damage causing electric shock! Kindly consult an appropriate computer expert rather than trying to do it yourself without having any experience and knowledge to do so.

I personally know of cases where untrained people have caused their PC motherboard to burn in trying to troubleshoot a simple problem of computer not booting up.

5. Do Not Over-Tweak Your Computer

Every Computer has a peak performance limit beyond which it cannot work whatever you may do as it cannot exceed it design limits of processor and other components.

So, avoid make changes to your system registry or over clocking your computer hardware to get performance boost unless you’re absolutely sure of what you’re doing. I am sure that you don’t wish to burn your computer by making its component heat up due to too much of processing load.

6. Have Your Data Backups Store at An Off-Site Location

This helps to protect your backup from damage in case of a fire or other natural disaster such as lightning, earthquakes and floods etc. Storing data and its backup at a single location is not a good idea for places where the probability of some natural disaster mentioned above is high.

7. Do Not Shift Your Computer when it is Powered On

Always power off and remove the power and data cables before shifting your computer even if you are doing it for a very small distance. A computer has ports, connectors and sockets to which various devices are attached and voltages are fed in them. Movement of computer with power being supplied to its parts can cause electric sparks leading to data loss.

8. Do Not Share Access To Your Networked PC with People Who You Do Not Know 

Your computer data can easily be lost and modified if anyone on the network (local or remote) can access your files freely due to you sharing it with everyone openly.

9. Practice Regular Hard Disk Maintenance

Clean up temporary files, junk files, and unused files and defragment your hard disk regularly from time to time. This helps to keep your hard disk on top form which decreases the chances of computer data loss. The most important secondary data storage device is computer hard disk and thus you need to take special care of it to avoid data loss due to its failure.

10. Hard Disk Read Failure Symptoms

You know it’s time to start taking backup of all your data files when your hard disk starts producing too much of noises and your system starts behaving strangely.

11. Do Not Drink Beverages While Working On Your Operational PC

Avoid drinking beverage on an operational PC as the spilled liquid can lead to a short circuit inside the computer causing data loss.

12. Make Sure That Electrical Wiring and Electrical Devices in Question Are Of Excellent Quality

Electrical wires, sockets, plugs, strips and switches etc. being used in any form to operate a computer must be of premium quality so that there are no short circuits or burning in any form of wires etc. leading to fire and thus damage to the PC and data stored on it.

How To Transform Your Windows To Mac OSX Lion…..lets change it


How to make  Your Windows look like Mac OsX Lion.

Just Install this Transformation Pack And Enjoy.

Features

-Seamless installation and uninstallation giving users safe transformation
-Easily configurable in single click with intelligence Metro UI design
-Designed for all editions of Windows XP/Vista/7 including Server Editions
-Genuine OS X Lion system resources
-Smart system files updating with auto-repair and Windows Update friendly
-UxStyle memory patching
-Lion Frame UI including Aero/Mac features for XP and non-Aero system
-OS X Lion themes, wallpapers, user pictures and logon screen
-OS X Dock emulation with pre-configured docklets optimized for stability/performance
-Expose and Spaces with shortcut keys configured

Make sure you uninstall Snow Transformation Pack with UAC turned off before installing this ones. Lion Transformation Pack can handles UAC at ease but Snow Transformation Pack can’t do the same so please don’t get confused. I hope this worths the wait for whole year as for both XP and Vista/7 users. Oh, there’s also UX Pack edition for people who find modifying system files little scary and want to try out zero-risk version.

Tip: If you having trouble keeping changes you made to RocketDock, download and run this fix.

Get Lion Transformation Pack (LTP) v1.0

Get Lion UX Pack (LUXP) v1.0

 

If Any Problem visit http://www.windowsxlive.net

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And Here Some Wallpapers For Make It Perfect..

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Connect Your Windows 8 With XBox (Xbox Companion in Windows 8)


How To Enable Xbox Companion in Windows 8

One thing Microsoft definitely is trying to get right with Windows 8 is the integration with Xbox. At the moment, this integration is minimal, but you can definitely see where Microsoft is heading with it: allowing you to play Xbox games from the console on the PC, pausing and resuming, etc. They aren’t there yet, but there are still some fun things you can do like control the Xbox using your PC.

 

Before you begin, make sure you are logged in to your Windows 8 PC with the same Windows Live account that you use on your Xbox and that both your Xbox and PC are connected to the same Wi-Fi network.

1. Launch Xbox Companion from the Metro start screen.

 

2. Turn on your Xbox 360.

3. Go to Settings > System > Console Settings.

4. Select Xbox Companion.

5. Select Available in the Xbox Companion Settings.

6. Click Connect on your PC.

Five steps to a fresh start on Facebook


It’s springtime, and a perfect excuse to do a little maintenance on the ol’ Facebook account. Follow these five steps to get started.

CP Material by Sharon Vaknin

Nearly a billion of us earthlings log into Facebook daily, and spend about 8 hours per month on the free social networking site.

From stalking catching up with friends, to sharing daily activity through status updates and apps, and customizing the look of our Timelines, many of us have invested hours in our online personas.

But how often do you review your account to adjust settings, throw out unused apps, and make necessary changes to reflect the way you presently use Facebook? It’s probably been a while since you did a little cleanup.

In the spirit of spring, follow these five steps to revamp your Facebook account and give yourself a fresh start on your most frequented social network.

1. Lock down your privacy
The most important step is to first confirm that you’re comfortable with the amount of information you’re sharing on Facebook–with friends, apps, and the service itself.

 

  • These five important privacy features introduced with Facebook Timeline are the minimum changes you should make to your account. They include tag approval, audience selection for any given post, and a feature that lets you see your profile the way everyone else does. Get the guide.
  • Revoke app permissions. Throughout your Facebook quest, you’ve probably enabled quite a few apps you no longer use. Clean up the list by deleting any inactive apps, as they can still harvest any data you initially allowed them to collect. To do so, head to the App Settings page and click the X next to the app to delete it, or click Edit to change the audience selection.
  • Are you still OK with Facebook knowing your birthday, religion, and sexual orientation? Generally speaking, Facebook primarily uses this data to serve you ads, but third-party apps can also collect this info when you enable them. Click this link to edit your profile now.
  • 2. Unlike, unfriend, and unsubscribe
    I’m always surprised at those who never review their friend list for potential people to toss out. No, you shouldn’t make a habit of it, but it’s important to remember that if you’re mostly sharing with “Friends” that’s potentially hundreds of people who are getting a peek into your personal life. My general rule of thumb is that if I wouldn’t say “hello” to them IRL, they shouldn’t be my “friend.” But before you go on a deleting rampage, check out these 7 things to consider before Facebook unfriending.

    While you’re at it, unlike and unsubscribe from any pages or public figures who may be clogging up your News Feed with information you don’t usually find useful or entertaining. You can quickly find your Subscriptions under the “Interests” header in the sidebar on the home page.

    3. Disable (or minimize) e-mail notifications

    Because you check Facebook so often, e-mail notifications about who commented on what are just redundant. Besides, e-mail notifications ruin the excitement one gets upon seeing that wonderful red bubble at login.

    Disable, or at least minimize, those e-mail notifications with this quick guide to adjusting the frequency of e-mail notifications.

    4. Organize your friends into lists
    Over time, as you add friends and subscribe to people and pages, your News Feed can become pretty noisy. To fix this, Facebook offers Lists, a feature that lets you organize people into, erm, lists. Use them to filter your News Feed.

    For example, I have a list for high school friends, colleagues, and my club, so that I can catch up on those individuals one group at a time. Follow this easy guide to get started with Lists.

    5. Update your bio
    It’s no surprise that employers check out potential workers’ Facebook profile as a regular part of the hiring process. After all, what better way to get an idea of who you are and what you’re like?

    Since there’s nothing you can really do to stop them from creeping on you (except deleting your account), the next best thing is to make your profile shine.

    As such, take the time to update your bio, work history, interests, and any other information you’re willing to volunteer. And if you’re feeling brave, make that information “Public” so that anyone who visits your profile can immediately get a sense of just how awesome you are.

    If you still have some gas left after your spring cleaning, check out these seven hidden, and superuseful Facebook features.

 

 

How To Install Windows 8 Consumer Preview


 

let’s try out Windows 8 alongside your existing OS.

See also:

We tested out some of the powerful but ungainly convertible laptops and ‘slate’ PCs that ran Windows XP Tablet Edition and – latterly – Windows 7, but their use was limited to vertical markets such as engineers and medical establishments. For everyday business or home use, their clunkiness and expense were compromises too far.

Windows 8 is different. It’s designed to work on tablets, laptops and PCs and essentially has two interfaces. The main interface, and the one you see first, is the new ‘Metro’ interface. Its large icons are optimised for touchscreens, but you can still control it with a mouse. The Classic desktop is hidden away and no longer has a Start menu. It’s there so you can run programs written for older versions of Windows. Again, this can be controlled by touch, but it’s best to revert to a keyboard and mouse for most tasks.

The initial public demonstration of Windows 8 back in September 2011 allowed Microsoft to stress-test the OS and to make important changes based on developer feedback. More than 100,000 changes were made, we’re told.

Windows 8 is now almost ready for its commercial launch. In preparation, Microsoft is offering anyone who wishes to, the chance to preview it and try out its features for the next few months. Known as the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, the trial operating system is best experienced as a secondary OS.

We strongly advise you against overwriting your existing version of Windows as you’ll be stuck if you decide Windows 8 isn’t for you or has compatibility issues with programs you run. We say this because you won’t be able to use any system restore options that your computer may offer. Your only option will be to reinstall the original operating system from a recovery DVD, but this will remove all programs, settings and documents that you’ve put on your computer.

Instead, we suggest you install Windows 8 Consumer Preview to a separate hard drive or a separate partition on your existing hard drive. Alternatively, it’s possible to run it within Windows 7 as a ‘virtual PC’. This can also be done on non-Windows computers: we successfully installed and ran it on a MacBook Pro using Parallels. If you want to give it a try on a Windows machine, download and install Microsoft’s free Virtual PC.

You’ll need to buy a full copy when Microsoft eventually releases Windows 8 as the Consumer Preview will stop working when that happens.

Installing Windows 8 Consumer Preview

1. Browse to Microsoft’s website (www.microsoft.com) and click on the Consumer Preview link. Click the ‘Download Windows 8 Consumer Preview’ button. A 5MB file is downloaded which you need to run. The Setup program will analyse your computer and tell you if your computer and programs are compatible.

2. Return to the same page on Microsoft’s website and click on the ‘ISO format’ link below the big blue button. Choose the 32bit or 64bit version depending on your requirements. Most people should opt for 64bit, but choose 32bit if you want to be able to run old 32bit programs or don’t have a 64bit processor.

3. Next, you need somewhere to install Windows 8 Consumer Preview. If you don’t have a spare hard disk, create a partition of at least 4GB for a dual-boot system. In Windows XP, Vista or 7 go to Start, Control Panel and choose Disk Management to check how much free space you’ve got.

4. Right-click on the drive you want to partition. Windows will determine how much unallocated space is available. If there’s very little, you could shrink the current partition, but space can be freed up using Disk Cleanup. We gained a further 1.5GB of drive space using this tool. Choose Create new simple volume.

5. Follow the wizard’s prompts. You can choose between FAT and NTFS drive types. Stick with the latter and click Next to proceed. Either accept the default drive name or type in your own. You’ll need to allow the drive to be formatted too

 

6. Burn the ISO image you downloaded in step 2 to a DVD. If you’re running Windows 7, it’s simply a case of double-clicking on it to launch the Windows Disc Image Burner tool. If you have Vista or XP, we recommend CDBurnerXP from cdburnerxp.de.

7. Reboot your PC and leave the DVD in the drive (or insert it into the drive of the computer onto which you want to install Windows 8). If your computer doesn’t boot from the disc, reboot again and enter the Bios. Look for a ‘boot priority’ menu and put the CD/DVD drive at the top of the list.

. When the PC has booted from the DVD, follow the instructions and enter the product key DNJXJ-7XBW8-2378T-X22TX-BKG7J when prompted. Click Install Now to proceed. Don’t choose Upgrade installation but click  Custom install. Make sure you choose the new partition you created, so you don’t overwrite your existing Windows setup.

9. The installation process will reboot your PC several times and will eventually boot into the new Metro user interface with its colourful tiles. For a guide on navigating around this new and unfamiliar desktop, see our complete guide to Windows 8.

courtesy by http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk

How To Install Windows 8 Consumer Preview


 

let’s try out Windows 8 alongside your existing OS.

See also:

We tested out some of the powerful but ungainly convertible laptops and ‘slate’ PCs that ran Windows XP Tablet Edition and – latterly – Windows 7, but their use was limited to vertical markets such as engineers and medical establishments. For everyday business or home use, their clunkiness and expense were compromises too far.

Windows 8 is different. It’s designed to work on tablets, laptops and PCs and essentially has two interfaces. The main interface, and the one you see first, is the new ‘Metro’ interface. Its large icons are optimised for touchscreens, but you can still control it with a mouse. The Classic desktop is hidden away and no longer has a Start menu. It’s there so you can run programs written for older versions of Windows. Again, this can be controlled by touch, but it’s best to revert to a keyboard and mouse for most tasks.

The initial public demonstration of Windows 8 back in September 2011 allowed Microsoft to stress-test the OS and to make important changes based on developer feedback. More than 100,000 changes were made, we’re told.

Windows 8 is now almost ready for its commercial launch. In preparation, Microsoft is offering anyone who wishes to, the chance to preview it and try out its features for the next few months. Known as the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, the trial operating system is best experienced as a secondary OS.

We strongly advise you against overwriting your existing version of Windows as you’ll be stuck if you decide Windows 8 isn’t for you or has compatibility issues with programs you run. We say this because you won’t be able to use any system restore options that your computer may offer. Your only option will be to reinstall the original operating system from a recovery DVD, but this will remove all programs, settings and documents that you’ve put on your computer.

Instead, we suggest you install Windows 8 Consumer Preview to a separate hard drive or a separate partition on your existing hard drive. Alternatively, it’s possible to run it within Windows 7 as a ‘virtual PC’. This can also be done on non-Windows computers: we successfully installed and ran it on a MacBook Pro using Parallels. If you want to give it a try on a Windows machine, download and install Microsoft’s free Virtual PC.

You’ll need to buy a full copy when Microsoft eventually releases Windows 8 as the Consumer Preview will stop working when that happens.

Installing Windows 8 Consumer Preview

1. Browse to Microsoft’s website (www.microsoft.com) and click on the Consumer Preview link. Click the ‘Download Windows 8 Consumer Preview’ button. A 5MB file is downloaded which you need to run. The Setup program will analyse your computer and tell you if your computer and programs are compatible.

2. Return to the same page on Microsoft’s website and click on the ‘ISO format’ link below the big blue button. Choose the 32bit or 64bit version depending on your requirements. Most people should opt for 64bit, but choose 32bit if you want to be able to run old 32bit programs or don’t have a 64bit processor.

3. Next, you need somewhere to install Windows 8 Consumer Preview. If you don’t have a spare hard disk, create a partition of at least 4GB for a dual-boot system. In Windows XP, Vista or 7 go to Start, Control Panel and choose Disk Management to check how much free space you’ve got.

4. Right-click on the drive you want to partition. Windows will determine how much unallocated space is available. If there’s very little, you could shrink the current partition, but space can be freed up using Disk Cleanup. We gained a further 1.5GB of drive space using this tool. Choose Create new simple volume.

5. Follow the wizard’s prompts. You can choose between FAT and NTFS drive types. Stick with the latter and click Next to proceed. Either accept the default drive name or type in your own. You’ll need to allow the drive to be formatted too

 

6. Burn the ISO image you downloaded in step 2 to a DVD. If you’re running Windows 7, it’s simply a case of double-clicking on it to launch the Windows Disc Image Burner tool. If you have Vista or XP, we recommend CDBurnerXP from cdburnerxp.de.

7. Reboot your PC and leave the DVD in the drive (or insert it into the drive of the computer onto which you want to install Windows 8). If your computer doesn’t boot from the disc, reboot again and enter the Bios. Look for a ‘boot priority’ menu and put the CD/DVD drive at the top of the list.

. When the PC has booted from the DVD, follow the instructions and enter the product key DNJXJ-7XBW8-2378T-X22TX-BKG7J when prompted. Click Install Now to proceed. Don’t choose Upgrade installation but click  Custom install. Make sure you choose the new partition you created, so you don’t overwrite your existing Windows setup.

9. The installation process will reboot your PC several times and will eventually boot into the new Metro user interface with its colourful tiles. For a guide on navigating around this new and unfamiliar desktop, see our complete guide to Windows 8.

courtesy by http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk

Hide Desktop Icon Text on Windows 7 or Vista


Some icons are just obvious enough that nobody should need text below them to tell them what the icon is for. A good example of this is the icon for Internet Explorer. We’re all really used to it by now, and the text just makes it ugly.

Just right-click on the shortcut, and choose Rename. Now hold down the Alt key and type in 255 on the keypad to the right of the keyboard. You can’t use the number keys right above the keyboard, they won’t work. If you have a laptop, you can turn on numlock and then use the little number keys next to the regular letters. (You know you always wondered what they were for)

For the first shortcut on the desktop, a simple Alt+255 will do. For the next shortcut, you’ll have to enter the combination twice (Alt+255, Alt+255). For the third, 3 times… you get the idea.

The way this works is that the Alt+255 character is blank, so the shortcut filename is actually just named with a character that is completely blank. Since you can’t have two shortcuts or files named the exact same thing, the second shortcut will have to be named with two blank characters.

Now we have a sweet looking icon on the desktop, with no bothersome text beneath it.

This tip should actually work on any version of Windows, but it works a lot better on Win7 or Vista, because they have beautiful icons.

If you use this tip to rename a folder, you will not be able to rename the folder back using the right-click rename. I’m not sure why this is. What you’ll have to do is open a command prompt and change directory into the containing folder (For instance, the desktop folder), and run this command:

ren “Alt+255″ “NewFolderName”

You will need to actually type the Alt+255 characters where illustrated in the command. It will appear as a space.

Note that the Recycle Bin icon won’t work this way (It does work on Windows 7, at least), you’ll have to follow this guide.

How to Use a 64-bit Web Browser on Windows


64-bit version of Windows don’t use 64-bit browsers by default – they’re still in their infancy, although even Adobe Flash now supports 64-bit browsers. Using a 64-bit browser can offer significant performance benefits, according to some benchmarks.

This article is for Windows users – 64-bit Linux distributions include 64-bit browsers, so you don’t have to do anything special on Linux.

Mozilla Firefox

ExtremeTech found that the 64-bit version of Firefox 8 was 10% faster than the 32-bit version in the Peacekeeper browser benchmark. Mozilla doesn’t yet offer official, stable 64-bit builds of Firefox, though. If you want to run 64-bit Firefox on Windows, your choices are an official-but-unstable nightly build or a stable-but-unofficial Waterfox.

Mozilla offers nightly builds of Firefox for testers – they’re constantly updating and can break, so they’re not the ideal candidate for your primary browser. The Firefox Nightly website lists 64-bit builds for Linux, but doesn’t even mention that the Windows ones exist.

Instead, you’ll find them buried on Mozilla’s FTP site. Look for the “win64” installer.

Waterfox is a 64-bit build of Firefox for Windows. Unlike the nightly version from Mozilla, Waterfox is based on the stable releases of Firefox. It’ll be a more bug-free, stable experience than the nightly builds. It even uses the same profile Firefox does.

According to Mozilla technical writer Jean-Yves Perrier, “There are currently no plan to release a 64-bit release of Firefox for Windows in 2012.”

Internet Explorer

Believe it or not, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer is ahead of the curve when it comes to 64-bit browsing on Windows. If you’re running a 64-bit version of Windows, you’ll find a 64-bit version of Internet Explorer already installed and available for use in your Start menu. No other Web browser installs a 64-bit version by default yet.

You’ll run into a snag if you actually want to use the 64-bit version of Internet Explorer as your default browser, though. To avoid confusion for users that might end up accidentally setting 64-bit IE as their default browser and running into plug-in compatibility problems, Microsoft won’t allow you to set 64-bit IE as your default browser.

You can still pin the 64-bit version to your taskbar or add its shortcut to your desktop, though.

If you want to set 64-bit IE as your default program for certain file types – say, .htm files – you’ll need to know its location. The 64-bit version is located at C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe, while the 32-bit version is located at C:\Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe.

Google Chrome

Sorry, Chrome fans – Google Chrome only has a 64-bit version for Linux. According to the Chromium project website, neither Chrome nor Chromium can currently be built for 64-bit Windows.

The upside is that it should only need “a small number of tweaks” to compile for 64-bit Windows. But it appears that no one has done the work yet.

Opera

Opera is now releasing 64-bit development snapshots for Windows. These will likely be unstable, so using them as your default browser is a bad idea. Opera advertises out-of-process plug-ins as a new feature that will allow 64-bit versions of Opera to run 32-bit plug-ins.

The development snapshots are branded as “Opera Next” and have a black-and-white logo to remind you of their incompleteness.

Plug-ins

Plug-in compatibility has always been the big problem with 64-bit browsers. Compiling a browser as a 64-bit binary is one thing; it’s another to drag plug-in developers along. In the past, 64-bit browsers have lacked Flash and other popular plug-ins. These days, the most popular plug-ins — Flash and Java — now have 64-bit versions. You may not already have them installed, though.

Visit the Adobe Flash Player download page in a 64-bit browser and you’ll be prompted to download the 64-bit installer. It includes a 32-bit version for your 32-bit browsers.

If you use Java, you can download a 64-bit build of Java from the manual download page. The 64-bit build includes a 64-bit plug-in – if you use both 32 and 64-bit browsers, you’ll have to install both Java packages.

Do you use a 64-bit browser? If so, do you see a speed difference? Share your experiences in the comments.

50 Windows 8 tips, tricks and secrets .(Jumbo pack)


50 Windows 8 tips, tricks and secrets

Windows 8 is coming, and the recent Consumer Preview showed it’s very different to what’s gone before.

Out goes the Start menu, in comes the new touch-oriented Metro Start screen, new apps, new interface conventions – even experienced PC users may be left feeling a little lost.

Don’t despair, though, help is at hand. We’ve been investigating every part of Windows 8 Consumer Preview, uncovering many of its most important tips and tricks, so read our guide and you’ll soon be equipped to get the most out of Microsoft’s latest release.

1. Lock screen

Windows 8 opens on its lock screen, which looks pretty but unfortunately displays no clues about what to do next.

It’s all very straightforward, though. Just tap the space bar, spin the mouse wheel or swipe upwards on a touch screen to reveal a regular login screen with the user name you created during installation. Enter your password to begin.

2. Basic navigation

Windows 8 launches with its new Metro interface, all colourful tiles and touch-friendly apps. And if you’re using a tablet then it’ll all be very straightforward: just swipe left or right to scroll the screen, and tap any tile of interest.

On a regular desktop, though, you might alternatively spin the mouse wheel to scroll backwards and forwards.

And you can also use the keyboard. Press the Home or End keys to jump from one end of your Start screen to the other, for instance, then use the cursor keys to select a particular tile, tapping Enter to select it. Press the Windows key to return to the Metro screen; right-click (or swipe down on) apps you don’t need and select Unpin to remove them; and drag and drop the other tiles around to organise them as you like.

3. App groups

The Start screen apps are initially displayed in a fairly random order, but if you’d prefer a more organised life then it’s easy to sort them into custom groups.

You might drag People, Mail, Messaging and Calendar over to the left-hand side, for instance, to form a separate “People” group. Click the magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the screen to carry out a “semantic zoom”, and you’ll now find you can drag and drop the new group (or any of the others) around as a block.

Right-click within the block (while still in the semantic zoom view) and you’ll also be able to give the group a name, which – if you go on to add another 20 or 30 apps to your Start screen – will make it much easier to find the tools you need.

4. Simplified Start menu?

The Windows 8 Developer Preview had a very basic Start menu which you could access by swiping from the right side of a touch screen, or moving the mouse cursor to the bottom left corner of the screen. This has changed a little in the Consumer Preview: now you need to right-click in the bottom left corner (or hold down the Windows key and press X) for a text-based menu which provides easy access to lots of useful applets and features: Device Manager, Control Panel, Explorer, the Search dialog and more.

5. Find your applications

The Win+X menu is useful, but no substitute for the old Start menu as it doesn’t provide access to your applications. To find this, hold down the Windows key and press Q (or right-click an empty part of the Start screen and select All Apps) to reveal a scrolling list of all your installed applications. Browse the various tiles to find what you need and click the relevant app to launch it.

6. Easy access

If there’s an application you use all the time then you don’t have to access it via the search system, of course. Pin it to the Start screen and it’ll be available at a click.

Start by typing part of the name of your application. Windows 8 Consumer Preview makes it more difficult to access Control Panel, for instance, so type Control.

Right-click the “Control Panel” tile on the Apps Search screen, and click “Pin to Start”.

Now press the Windows key, scroll to the right and you’ll see the Control Panel tile at the far end. Drag and drop this over to the left somewhere if you’d like it more easily accessible, then click the tile to open the desktop along with the Control Panel window, and press the Windows key to return you to the Start screen when you’ve done.

7. Shutting down

You’ve finished your first Windows 8 session, and would like to close your system down – but with no Start menu it’s not exactly obvious how this can be done.

It’s easy enough when you know the secret, though. Just move the mouse cursor to the bottom right corner of the screen, click the Settings icon – or just hold down the Windows key and press I – and you’ll see a power button. Click this and choose “Shut down” or “Restart”.

Some of the tricks available in previous versions of Windows still apply. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del, for instance, click the power button in the bottom right-hand corner and you’ll be presented with the same “Shut down” and “Restart” options.

And if you’re on the desktop, press Alt+F4 and you’ll be able to choose Shut Down, Restart, Sign Out or Switch User option

8. App bar

Metro apps aim to be simpler than old-style Windows applets, which means it’s goodbye to menus, complex toolbars, and many interface standards. There will be usually be a few options available on the App bar, though, so if you’re unsure what to do then right-click an empty part of the screen or press Windows+Z to take a closer look.

9. What’s running?

If you launch a Metro app, play with it for a while, then press the Windows key you’ll switch back to the Start screen. Your app will remaining running, but as there’s no taskbar then you might be wondering how you’d ever find that out.

You could just press Alt+Tab, which shows you what’s running just as it always have.

Holding down the Windows key and pressing Tab displays a pane on the left-hand side of the screen with your running apps. (To see this with the mouse, move your cursor to the top left corner of the screen, wait until the thumbnail of one app appears, then drag down.)

And of course you can always press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to see all your running apps in the Task Manager, if you don’t mind (or actually need) the extra technical detail.

10. Closing an app

Metro apps don’t have close buttons, but this isn’t the issue you might think. Apps are suspended when you switch to something else so they’re only a very minimal drain on your system, and if you need the system resources then they’ll automatically be shut down. (Their context will be saved, of course, so on relaunching they’ll carry on where you left off.)

If you want to close down an app anyway, though, move the mouse cursor up to the top of the screen. When it turns from the regular mouse pointer to the icon of a hand, hold down the left mouse button and drag it down the screen. Your app should shrink to a thumbnail which you can drag off the screen to close it.

If that’s too much hassle then simply pressing Alt+F4 still works.

And when all else fails then press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to launch Task Manager, right-click something in the Apps list and select End Task. Beware, though, close something you shouldn’t and it’s easy to crash or lock up your PC.

11. Mastering Metro Internet Explorer

Metro apps don’t always work as you’d expect. Click the Internet Explorer tab, for instance, and you’ll launch a full-screen version without toolbars, menus or sidebars, which like so much of Windows 8 may leave you initially feeling lost.

Right-click an empty part of the page, though, and you’ll find options to create and switch between tabs, as well as a Refresh button, a “Find” tool and the ability to pin an Internet shortcut to the Start page.

But if that’s not enough then you can also launch the regular Internet Explorer from the desktop, just as before. Note its icon position on the taskbar – the first being 1, the second 2 and so on – and then you can hold down the Windows key at any time and press that number to open full-strength IE.

12. Run two apps side by side

Metro apps are what Microsoft call “immersive” applications, which basically means they run full-screen – but there is a way to view two at once. Swipe from the left and the current app will turn into a thumbnail; drop this and one app displays in a sidebar pane while the other takes the rest of the screen. And you can then swap these by swiping again.

Or, if you’re using a keyboard, use Win+. to snap an app to the right, or Win+Shift+. to snap to the left. (Whatever the interface, you can’t snap apps unless your screen resolution is at least 1366 x 768.)

As an example of how you might use this, launch the Map applet and press Win+., then switch back to the Start screen and launch your desktop. And now you have a live, scrolling Map applet on the right side of your screen which is effectively working as a desktop sidebar, and you can access simply by moving the mouse there and clicking on it. If you need more space then drag the separator to the left and the desktop will shrink to a left-hand sidebar, but both apps remain active and working, so you can use Metro and regular desktop tools side by side.

13. Spell check

Metro apps all have spellcheck where relevant, which looks and works much as it does in Microsoft Office. Make a mistake and a wavy red line will appear below the offending word; tap or right-click this to see suggested alternative words, or add the word to your own dictionary if you prefer.

14. Run as Administrator

Some programs need you to run them with Administrator rights before they’ll work properly. The old context menu isn’t available for a pinned Start screen app, but right-click one, and if it’s appropriate for this app then you’ll see a Run As Administrator option.

15. Uninstall easily

The latest Windows 8 apps are better than those in the Developer Preview, but they’re still a fairly random selection and you’re sure to find some that you’ll rarely, if ever use. In which case right-clicking one of their Start screen tiles will display a few relevant options.

If this is one of the larger tiles, for instance, choosing “Small” will cut it down to half the size, freeing up some valuable Start screen real estate.

If you just want to dismiss the app for now, select “Unpin from Start”. The tile will disappear, but if you change your mind then you can always add it again later. (Search for the app, right-click it, select Pin to Start.)

Or, if you’re sure you’ll never want to use an app again, choose Uninstall to remove it entirely.

16. Apps and privacy

Once you’ve explored your built-in apps then launching the Windows 8 Store will provide easy to access to around 70 more: games, video and music apps, photo tools and more. While not bad for a beta, it’s obviously a very small selection when compared to other app stores, so there’s no need to worry particularly about privacy issues.

It is worth keeping in mind that by default Windows 8 apps can use your name, location and account picture, though. But if you’re not happy with that, it’s easily changed. Press Win+I, click More PC Settings, select Privacy and click the relevant buttons to disable any details you’d rather not share.

17. Install anything

Most mobile platforms recommend you only install apps from approved sources to protect your security, and Windows 8 is the same: it’ll only allow you to install trusted (that is, digitally signed) apps from the Windows store.

If this proves a problem, though, and you’re willing to take the security risk (because this isn’t something to try unless you’re entirely sure it’s safe), then the system can be configured to run trusted apps from any source. Launch GPEdit.msc, browse to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > App Package Deployment, double-click “Allow all trusted apps to install” and select Enabled > OK.

18. Administrative tools

Experienced Windows users who spend much of their time in one advanced applet or another are often a little annoyed to see their favourite tools buried by Windows 8. Microsoft have paid at least some attention, though, and there is a way to bring some of them back.

Open the Metro Settings panel (press Win+I), click the Settings link, change “Show administrative tools” to Yes and click back on an empty part of the Start screen. And it’s as simple as that. Scroll to the right and you’ll find a host of new tiles for various key applets – Performance Monitor, Event Viewer, Task Scheduler, Resource Monitor and more – ready to be accessed at a click.

19. Disable the lock screen

If you like your PC to boot just as fast as possible then the new Windows 8 lock screen may not appeal. Don’t worry, though, if you’d like to ditch this then it only takes a moment.

Launch GPEdit.msc (the Local Group Policy Editor) and browse to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Control Panel > Personalisation.

Double-click “Do not display the lock screen”, select Enabled and click OK.

Restart and the lock screen will have gone.

20. Log in automatically

Of course even if you remove the lock screen, you’ll still be forced to manually log in every time your system starts. This can also be resolved at speed, though, using much the same technique as in previous versions of Windows.

Hold down the Windows key, press R, type netplwiz and press Enter to launch the User Accounts dialog.

Clear the “Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer” box and click OK.

Enter the user name and password of the account that you’d like to be logged in automatically, click OK, restart your system and this time it should boot directly to the Start screen.

21. Replacing the Start menu

If Windows 8’s search and navigation tools still leave you pining for the regular Start menu, installing ViStart will replace it with something very similar.

Download the program and install it, carefully; it’s free, but the Setup program will install the trial of a commercial Registry cleaner unless you explicitly tell it otherwise.

But once that’s out the way, your old Start button will return in its regular place, and clicking it (or pressing the Windows key) will bring back the usual Start menu complete with search box and all the usual menus.

The program has a few flaws – on launch it gave us an E-mail icon for “Outlook Express”, for instance – but otherwise works well.

There’s also Start8 from Windows customisation veterans Stardock. It provides similar functionality to ViStart but with a more up-to-date look.

22. Windows key shortcuts

The Windows Metro interface is a major change, and it’ll probably take quite some time before you’re familiar and comfortable with the new way of working. In the meantime, though, mastering the various Windows key shortcuts could save you a great deal of time and hassle.

  • Win : switch between the Start screen and the last-running Metro app
  • Win + C : displays the “Charms”: the Settings, Devices, Share and Search options
  • Win + D : launches the desktop
  • Win + E : launches Explorer
  • Win + F : opens the File Search pane
  • Win + H : opens the Share pane
  • Win + I : opens Settings
  • Win + K : opens the Devices pane
  • Win + L : locks your PC
  • Win + M : minimises the current Explorer or Internet Explorer window (works in the full-screen Metro IE, too)
  • Win + O : toggles device orientation lock on and off
  • Win + P : switch your display to a second display or projector
  • Win + Q : open the App Search pane
  • Win + R : opens the Run box
  • Win + U : open the Ease of Access Centre
  • Win + V : cycle through toasts (notifications)
  • Win + W : search your system settings (type POWER for links to all power-related options, say)
  • Win + X : displays a text menu of useful Windows tools and applets
  • Win + Z : displays the right-click context menu when in a full-screen Metro app
  • Win + + : launch Magnifier and zoom in
  • Win + – : zoom out
  • Win + , : Aero peek at the desktop
  • Win + Enter : launch Narrator
  • Win + PgUp : Move the current Metro screen to the left-hand monitor
  • Win + PgDn : Move the current Metro screen to the right-hand monitor
  • Win + PrtSc : capture the current screen and save it to your Pictures folder
  • Win + Tab : switch between running Metro apps

23. Launch programs fast

If you’re a fan of keyboard shortcuts and don’t like the idea of scrolling through Metro tiles to find the program you need, don’t worry, Windows 8 still supports a useful old shortcut. Which is perfect if, say, you’re looking to be able to shut down your PC with a click.

Launch the desktop app, right-click an empty part of the desktop and click New > Shortcut.

Browse to the application you’d like to launch here. Of for the sake of this example, enter

shutdown.exe -s -t 00

to shut down your PC, or

shutdown.exe -h -t 00

to hibernate it, and click Next. Type a shortcut name – Hibernate, say – and click Finish.

Right-click the shortcut, select Pin to Start and it should appear on the far right of the Metro screen – just drag the tile wherever you like.

24. Intelligent screengrabs

If a Metro application is showing something interesting and you’d like to record it for posterity, then hold down the Windows key, press PrtSc, and the image won’t just go to the clipboard: it’ll also be automatically saved to your My Pictures folder with the name Screenshot.png (and then Screenshot(1).png, Screenshot(2).png and so on).

You might hope that pressing Win+Alt+PrtSc would similarly save an image of the active window, but no, sadly not. Maybe next time.

25. Photo Viewer

Double-click an image file within Explorer and it won’t open in a Photo Viewer window any more, at least not by default. Instead you’ll be switched to the full-screen Metro Photos app, bad news if you thought you’d escaped such hassles by using the desktop.

If you’d like to fix this, go to Control Panel > Programs > Default Programs and select Set your default programs.

Scroll down and click Windows Photo Viewer in the Programs list.

Finally, click “Set this program as default” if you’d like the Viewer to open all the file types it can handle, or select the “Choose default” options if you prefer to specify which file types it should open. Click OK when you’re done.

26. SmartScreen

Windows 8 now uses IE’s SmartScreen system-wide, checking downloaded files to ensure they’re safe. In general this is a good thing, but if you have any problems then it can be tweaked.

Launch Control Panel, open the Action Centre applet, and click Change Windows SmartScreen Settings in the left-hand pane. Here you can keep the warning, but avoid the requirement for administrator approval, or turn SmartScreen off altogether. Make your choice and click OK to finish.

27. Windows 8 File History

Windows 8 includes an excellent File History feature, which can regularly and automatically back up your libraries, desktop, contacts and favourites to a second drive (even a USB flash drive – just connect it, and choose “Configure this drive for backup using File History” from the menu).

To set this up, go to Control Panel > System and Security > File History. Click Exclude Folders to help define what you’re saving, Advanced Settings to choose the backup frequency, Change Drive to choose the backup destination, and Turn On to enable the feature with your settings.

And once it’s been running for a while, you can check on the history for any file in Explorer by selecting it, choosing the Home tab and clicking History.

28. VHD – enhanced

Windows 7 added support for creating and attaching virtual hard drives in Microsoft’s VHD format. Now Windows 8 extends this with the new VHDX format, which improves performance, extends the maximum file size from 2 to 16TB, and makes the format “more resilient to power failure events” (so they shouldn’t get corrupted as easily). Launch the Computer Management Control Panel applet, choose Disk Management, and click Actions > Create VHD to give the format a try.

29. Storage Spaces

If you have multiple hard drives packed with data then you’ll know that managing them can be a hassle. But that’s all about to change with a new Windows 8 Consumer Preview feature, Storage Spaces.

The idea is that you can take all your hard drives, whether connected via USB, SATA or SAS (Serial Attached SCSI), and add them to a storage pool. And you can then create one or more spaces within this pool, formatting and accessing them as a single drive, so you’ve only one drive letter to worry about.

What’s more, the technology can also maximise your performance by spreading files across multiple drives (the system can then access each chunk simultaneously). There’s an option to mirror your files, too, so even if one disk fails your data remains safe. And if your Storage Space begins to fill up then just plug in another drive, add it to the pool and you can carry on as before.

Yes, we know, this is just a consumer-friendly take on RAID. But there’s nothing wrong with that, and it looks promising. If you’d like to read up on the technical details then the official Windows 8 blog has more, and you can then create and manage your drive pool from the new Control Panel\System and Security “Storage Spaces” applet.

30. Virtual Machines

Install Windows 8 and you also get Microsoft’s Hyper-V, allowing you to create and run virtual machines (as long as you’re not running in a virtual machine already). Launch OptionalFeatures.exe, check Hyper-V and click OK to enable the feature. Then switch back to Metro, scroll to the right, find and click on the Hyper-V Manager tile to begin exploring its capabilities.

31. Smart Searching

When you’re in the mood to track down new Windows 8 features relating to a particular topic, you might be tempted to start by manually browsing Control Panel for interesting applets – but there is a simpler way.

If you’d like to know what’s new in the area of storage, say, just press Win+W to launch the Settings Search dialog, type drive , and the system will return a host of related options. That is, not just those with “drive” in the name, but anything storage-related: BitLocker, Device Manager, backup tools, disk cleanup, and interesting new features like Storage Spaces.

This Search feature isn’t new, of course, but it’s easy to forget how useful this can be, especially when you’re trying to learn about a new operating system. So don’t just carry out specific searches, use the Apps search to look for general keywords such as “privacy” or “performance”, and you just might discover something new.

32. Start screen background

If you’d like to change your lock, user tile or start screen images then press Win + I, click “More PC settings” and choose the Personalize option. Browse the various tabs and you’ll be able to choose alternative images or backgrounds in a click or two. And in theory you’ll also be able to define apps that will display their status on the lock screen, although the app must specifically support this before it’ll be accessible from your Personalize settings.

33. Scheduled Maintenance

Windows 8 Consumer Preview will now run common maintenance tasks – software updates, security scanning, system diagnostics and more at a scheduled convenient time, which is good.

Unfortunately it doesn’t actually ask you what time is convenient, instead just setting it to 3am and allowing the system to wake your computer (if hardware and circumstances permit) to do its work. Which isn’t so good.

To change this, launch Control Panel, click System and Security > Action Centre > Maintenance. You can now click “Start maintenance” to launch any outstanding tasks right now, while selecting “Change maintenance settings” enables you to choose a more convenient time, and optionally disable the feature’s ability to wake up your computer if that’s not required.

34. Picture password

Windows 8 allows you to create a picture password, where you choose an image, then draw on it in a combination of taps, lines and circles – only someone who can reproduce this pattern will be able to log on. Select Win + I > More PC Settings > Users > Create a Picture Password to give this a try.

35. Hibernate or Sleep

You won’t necessarily see either Hibernate or Sleep in the Windows 8 shutdown dialogs, but if that’s a problem then you may be able to restore them.

Launch the Control Panel Power Options applet (powercfg.cpl) and click “Choose what the power buttons do” in the left-hand pane.

If you see a “Change settings that are current unavailable” link, then click it, and if Windows 8 detects that your PC supports Sleep and Hibernate options then they’ll be displayed here. Check the boxes next to whatever you’d like to use, click Save Changes, and the new options should now appear in your shutdown dialogs.

36. Simplify Search

By default Windows 8 includes every bundled app in its Search results. If you’ll never want to use some of these – the Store app, say – then select Win + I > More PC Settings > Users > Search, choose which apps you don’t want included, and your search list will be more manageable in future.

37. Touch Keyboard

By default the Touch Keyboard will try to help you out by, for instance, playing sounds as you type, capitalising the first letter of each sentence, adding a period if you double-tap the spacebar, and more. If any of this gets in your way, though, you can turn the relevant feature off: just go to Win + I > More PC Settings > Users > General and customise the keyboard to suit your needs.

38. Sync and privacy

One very useful Windows 8 feature is its ability to synchronise your settings with other PCs and devices. So if you’ve set up your new Windows Phone mobile with your contacts, email details etc, then use the same Live account on Windows 8 and it’ll import them for you: very convenient.

Of course that may not always be a good idea. If several people use a device then you may not want your website passwords to be synced, for instance. In which case you’ll want to hold down the Windows key and press I, then click More PC Settings > Sync Your Settings and disable anything which you’d rather not share.

39. Hiding the Ribbon

The latest incarnation of Windows Explorer uses a Microsoft Office-like ribbon interface. We think this is a reasonable move, and you should give the system a chance to see if you can get used to it, but if it just doesn’t appeal then a straightforward tweak will kill it forever.

Simply launch GPEdit.msc, browse to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Explorer, double-click “Start Windows Explorer with ribbon minimized” and click Enabled > OK. Restart Explorer and the ribbon now won’t be displayed by default. Click the Down arrow to the left of the Help icon if you’d like to see it.

40. Quick Access Toolbar

The latest Explorer features a Quick Access Toolbar immediately above the menu, providing easy access to options like “New Folder”, “Minimise”, “Undo” and more.

This is customisable, too – click the arrow to the right of the default buttons, in the Explorer window caption bar, and choose whatever options you need. And you can include add any other ribbon option on the Quick Access Toolbar by right-clicking it and selecting Add to Quick Access Toolbar.

41. Advanced menu options

If you need to run the command prompt as an Administrator then your instant reaction will probably be to reach for the Start menu. Before becoming annoyed a microsecond later when you remember it’s no longer there.

It’s good to see that Microsoft have provided a simple alternative, then – just click the File menu in Explorer and click Open command prompt > Open command prompt as administrator.

And while you’re there, make note of the other advanced new options also on that menu: you can open a new window in a new process, open Explorer, and even delete your Recent Places and Address Bar histories with a click.

42. Show all folders

The default Windows 8 Explorer view doesn’t show all the usual drives and folders – Control Panel, Recycle Bin and so on – in the left-hand navigation pane. It certainly keeps the display simple, and if you want to see all your drives then you can just click Computer, but if you prefer to see everything up-front then it only takes a moment. Click View > Options, check “Show all folders” and click OK.

43. Mount ISO files in Windows 8

Need to take a closer look at an ISO file? Right-click it in Explorer, click Mount and you can view it as a virtual drive, launch the files it contains, or add more if you like.

44. Open new file types

If you find a file type which none of your applications can handle, then we have some good news, and some bad.

The good news is that that the Explorer right-click Open With menu now has a “Look for an app in the Store” option, which sounds like the system will use some automated search tool to find and highlight an app for you.

The bad news is that it does nothing of the kind, right now at least – all that happens is the store opens and you’re left to browse its contents manually. A pity, but maybe this is a beta-related? The Store doesn’t yet have a manual keyword search function either, just yet – if one appears after some future update then check the Open With function again, just to see if it’s any more useful.

45. Restart Explorer

If Explorer locks up for some reason, then regaining control is now very easy. No need to close the process any more: simply press Ctrl+Alt+Esc, select Explorer in the list, click Restart and Windows 8 will handle the rest.

46. VirtualBox error

The safest way to sample Windows 8 CP is to install it on a VirtualBox virtual machine. It’s fairly easy to set up, there’s no need to worry about partitioning or other issues, and if it doesn’t work for whatever reason (which is possible, it’s a beta after all) then you’ll have lost nothing but a little time.

After completing your installation, though, you might find your virtual Windows 8 complaining that “Your PC needs to be repaired”. But despite telling you to “Press Enter to try again”, or “Press F8 for alternate boot options”, neither option works.

Fortunately there’s an easy answer. Close the Windows 8 window, select your virtual machine in VirtualBox, click Settings > System > Processor and check the “Enable PAE/NX” box. Click OK, restart your virtual machine and this time it should launch properly.

47. Metro apps won’t launch

You click a Metro app, and nothing else happens? Display issues are often the cause. In particular, Metro apps don’t currently support screen resolutions lower than 1024×768 (or 1366 x 768 when snapping), so increase your resolution if possible (launch the desktop, right-click, select Screen Resolution).

Or if that’s no help, try updating your video drivers.

48. Performance problems

If your Windows 8 system seems sluggish, the revamped task manager may be able to offer some clues. Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to take a look.

The simplified Processes tab then reveals what’s currently using your CPU time, RAM, hard drive and network bandwidth. (The more in-depth data available in previous Task Manager versions is now accessible via the Details tab.)

The Performance tab gives you a graphical view of resource use over the last few seconds, while the App History dialog looks back over days or more to reveal which app is the most resource-hungry.

And is your boot time slow? Click the new Startup tab to see programs your system is launched when Windows boots. The “Startup impact” now shows how much of an effect each of these has on your boot time; if you spot high impact programs you’re sure you don’t need, then right-clicking them and selecting “Disable” will ensure they’re not loaded next time.

Powerful though all this is, if you can think of a reason to use the old Task Manager then it’s still accessible. Hold down the Windows key, press R, type TaskMGR and press Enter to launch it. (Typing TM will launch the new version.)

49. Device Manager Events

If you’ve a driver or hardware-related problem with Windows 8, launch Device Manager, browse to the relevant device, right-click it, select Properties and click the new Events tab. If Windows has installed drivers, related services or carried out other important actions on this device then you’ll now see them here, very useful when troubleshooting.

50. Recovery options

Windows 8 Consumer Preview has performed well for us, but if you find it won’t boot at some point then you now have to press Shift+F8 during the launch process to access its recovery tools.

Access the Troubleshoot menu, then Advanced Options and you’ll be able to try the Automatic Repair tool, which may fix your problems. No luck? The same menu enables you to use the last System Restore point, tweak key Windows Startup settings, even open a command prompt if you’d like to troubleshoot your system manually.

If that all seems like too much hassle then the Troubleshoot menu’s option to “Refresh your PC” may be preferable, as it essentially reinstalls Windows 8 but keeps your files, and will fix many issues.

But if it doesn’t then there’s always the more drastic “Reset your PC” option, which removes all your files and installs a fresh new copy of Windows 8.

You don’t have to access these features from the boot menu, of course. If Windows 8 starts but seems very unstable, then open the new Recovery applet in Control Panel for easy access to the Refresh, Reset and other disaster recovery features.

Ten Super awesome tricks every Windows 7 power user should know :-)


Put multiple clocks in the taskbar

Are you a Windows 7 power user? Do you want to be? I’ve scoured my archive of tips, shortcuts, and secrets to find the hidden gems even some Windows experts don’t know about. These aren’t esoteric tweaks – they’re honest-to-goodness productivity boosters that will save you time and keystrokes.

Let’s get started …

Quick! What time is it in Abu Dhabi right now? How about London, Moscow, or Beijing? Even if you could memorize the time zones, good luck keeping up with the changes in Daylight Saving Time.

Normally, that doesn’t matter, but if you have friends, family, or co-workers in a distant time zone, knowing the exact time can help you coordinate times for phone calls or online conferences.

For a foolproof solution, make this small tweak to the Windows 7 clock. Click the time at the right side of the taskbar and then click Change Date And Time Settings. On the Additional Clocks tab, you can define one or two extra clocks, each with a time zone and a custom label of your choosing.

After you get things set up, click the time to see your custom clocks. The big one is local time, and the ones next to it are your custom additions.

Minimize annoying sounds with the Volume Mixer

I don’t know about you, but the little beeps, blurps, and whoops that some Windows programs make are like fingernails on a chalkboard. Do you really need to hear a sound every time someone one of your friends tweets something?

If you want to keep those sounds around but tone them down, use the Volume Mixer. Right-click the speaker icon next to the clock to open the menu shown here. Click Open Volume Mixer to display a set of sliders, with a master volume control on the left and individual sliders for every open program.

Move the slider down for any program you want to soften. Windows remembers your choice and keeps that program’s sound at your preset level until you change it.

Use shortcut keys to open your favorite programs

This is one of my absolute favorite Windows 7 tips. You already know you can pin program icons to the Windows taskbar, and you can drag them left or right to arrange them in any order you want.

That order is actually more meaningful than you think. Each one of the first ten icons on the taskbar is associated with a unique keyboard shortcut: press the Windows key plus the number of the shortcut to open that program, or switch to it if it’s already running. (Use Windows key+0 for the 10th icon on the taskbar.)

So, in the example shown here, as long as you know that the IE9 icon is in position 1 and Chrome is in position 8, you can get to each program any time.

Your shortcut keys will, of course, be different. If Chrome is your absolute favorite program, you can pin its icon in the first position and it will open for you with Windows key+1.

For programs that show thumbnails for each open document, you can use the keyboard shortcut to cycle through each one. IE is a good example: in this example, based on the layout of icons I have on my desktop, I can press Windows key+1 repeatedly to cycle through all open tabs.

Copy the path for a file name

This tip might sound weird and esoteric until you think about how you many times you’re likely to use it.

You’re looking through Windows Explorer and you find a file you want to upload to Facebook or use as your Twitter profile picture. So you open your web browser, find the upload page, and then … ah, crap, you have to browse through all those folders until you find the folder with the picture in it. Right?

Wrong.

In Windows Explorer hold down the Shift key and right-click on the file you want to upload. That extra keystroke reveals the hidden Copy As Path command on the shortcut menu. Click it, and the full path of the file is copied to the Clipboard.

Now go back to that web page, open the Browse dialog box, and paste in that copied path. No browsing required.

I use this shortcut constantly. It’s amazing how many times it comes in handy. It will save you many, many clicks.

Get detailed system info

When I’m helping a friend or family member tune up a slow or troublesome PC, one of the first things I check for is whether they have the latest BIOS revision. Most people never update their BIOS, and in the case of hardware or OS upgrades it can often be the key to solving mysterious crashes.

You can use a search engine to find the latest BIOS release for a particular PC model, but how do you know what’s in the PC you’re working with?

Use the System Information utility. You can find it easily enough: just click Start and begin typing System Information in the search box. The shortcut should pop to the top of the list within four or five characters.

The System Summary page includes a wealth of information, including the manufacturer and model (for major-brand PCs), the exact processor, and the BIOS version and date.

TO BE CONTINUE IN NEXT POST,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,


How To Make Windows 7 Look Like Classy,Simple and Professional Apple Mac Look. (Awesome Desktop)


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How To make WINDOWS  7 Look a little like APPLE MAC OsX 🙂

written by: Shan M Saleem

A Very professional , Sleek And Simple Desktop Totally customizable..

All You Need Is :

RAINMETER    ………. Download here or visit http://rainmeter.net

        
OMNIMO (a rainmeter theme)  ………. Download File or visit deviantart.com.

Apple theme For  windows 7  which i have already added on blog……Download Futuristic Minimal
  

And Some Wallpapers..

Just install rainmeter and Add Omnimo Theme in Rainmeter Then Install this theme Theme  and create your apple Pc As You Want…

Note: I have already wrote some blogs on How To Use Rainmeter and Omnimo and How To Install Shell Themes.that is why i am not writing complete detail about it. you can search all this things in my blog.. 

some wallpapers for you.(click for full size)

you can download more from deviantart.com,customize.org,etc

Don’t Forget To Leave Your beautiful Comments…

You Can ask me if  have any problem….

THANKs For Visit

Shan M Saleem(Admin).

How to Change Boot Screen, Log On Screen,Icons etc in Windows XP…


  • written by:Shan M Saleem

Hello……………    n   …..Assalaam u Alaikum

It’s Strange but in this era(2012).which is the era of windows 8.alot of peoples are still using windows Xp.and a friend of mine (Mohsin Ayaz Khan) asked me “How to change boot and log on screens in WINDOWS XP    ..

A lot of the great artists   HAVE designed complete visual themes for Windows XP/ and might be still designing comprised of different components such as shellstyles, wallpapers, sounds, visual styles, screensavers, icons, and cursors. ThemeXP distributes not only complete themes, visual styles and wallpapers separately, but also has Windows XP logins and bootscreens, as well as icons (.iconsets). A visual theme will consist of a .theme file and several other elements of the authors choosing (from the items listed above), of which a visual style (.msstyles) file is mandatory. If there is a single self-installing executable file inside the download, just unzip it and install. If the files are separate, then there should be a .theme file and an associated folder with the visual style and other author inclusions inside the .zip, (if it’s packaged correctly).Visual Styles

If your download only consists of a visual style (.msstyles) file inside the .zip, then open it using your favorite install software(Or the Windows default software in the Control Panel.

(i recommend that the easiest way of change bootscreen,log on screen,icon package and all is” TUNE UP UTILITIES “Software.

…which is available on my site with registration key.search it if u want. 

Now I Am going to write analog way to change all of these things…. it might be difficult for beginners…

Logins

The simplest and safest way to change a login screen is to use a quality third-party application. If you feel comfortable doing it manually though, here are some excellent instructions courtesy of bFarber Logins (bfarber.com).

  1. In Explorer, browse to C:\Windows\System32 and find the file named “logonui.exe”.
  2. Rename “logonui.exe” to “logonui.exe.bak”. This way if anything messes up…you have a backup.
  3. Place your new login in C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 and rename it to logonui.exe.
  4. That’s it! Now when you log off your new login screen will be there.

Wallpapers

  1. Download the wallpaper .zip file to your computer.
  2. Extract the .jpg file from the .zip and open it in Microsoft Windows Picture and Fax Viewer.
  3. Right-click on the image and choose “Set as Desktop Background”.
  4. Your new wallpaper should appear as your desktop background.

Boot Screens

The simplest and safest way to change a boot screen is to also use a quality third-party application. If you feel comfortable doing it manually though, here are the complete instructions for doing so.

  1. In Explorer, browse to C:\Windows\System32 and find the file named “ntoskrnl.exe”.
  2. Copy “ntoskrnl.exe” to “ntoskrnl.exe.bak”, (COPY not RENAME). This way if anything goes wrong…you will have a backup.
  3. Extract the files inside the .zip file you downloaded to a temporary location of your hard drive, butNOT to C:\Windows\System32.
  4. Reboot your computer into Safe Mode (hit F8 before the boot screen appears) or into true DOS mode (from a boot disk)
  5. Browse to where you extracted the files for your new boot screen in Explorer and select the correct file to copy to C:\Windows\System32. If you have SP1 for Windows XP installed use ntoskrnlsp.exe, otherwise use ntoskrnl.exe. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO USE THE CORRECT FILE, OR YOUR SYSTEM WILL LOCK UP ON BOOT.
  6. If using ntoskrnl.exe, copy the file to C:\Windows\System32 overwriting the existing ntoskrnl.exe, (which should have been backed up).
  7. If you are going to use ntoskrnlsp.exe, delete ntoskrnl.exe in the temporary folder and rename ntoskrnlsp.exe to ntoskrnl.exe. Then copy the file to C:\Windows\System32 overwriting the existing ntoskrnl.exe, (which should have been backed up).
  8. All done! Reboot your computer as you normally would and enjoy your new boot screen.

IconSets

The only way to apply IconSets is to use Style XP 2.0 from TGTSoft. To work with an IconSet, start Style XP and click on the ‘Icons’ button. From there things should be pretty well self-explanatory using Apply, Add, Delete, etc.

ExplorerBar Icons

The only way to apply Explorerbar (.iebarzip) icons is to use “TuneUp Utilities”. If this is your first set that you are applying, create a directory title ‘ExplorerBar’ in ‘C:\Windows\Resources\’ and extract the .iebarzip file from your download to that location. Future downloads of this type can then be extracted to that location directly. TuneUp Utilities and will find them automatically. To apply ExplorerBar icons, start Style XP and click on the ‘ExplorerBar’ button. From there things should be pretty well self-explanatory using Apply, Add, Delete, etc.


THANKS FOR READ… DON’T FORGET TO LEAVE COMMENTS.

Written by: Shan M Saleem.

How to Reset Your Forgotten Windows Password the Easy Way


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Forgetting your password is never any fun, but luckily there’s a really easy way to reset the password. All you need is a copy of the Windows installation disk and one simple command line trick.

Resetting Your Forgotten Windows Password

Boot off the Windows disk and select the “Repair your computer” option from the lower left-hand corner.

Follow through until you get to the option to open the Command Prompt, which you’ll want to select.

First you’ll want to type in the following command to backup the original sticky keys file:

copy c:\windows\system32\sethc.exe c:\

Then you’ll copy the command prompt executable (cmd.exe) over top of the sticky keys executable:

copy c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe c:\windows\system32\sethc.exe

Now you can reboot the PC.

Resetting the Password

Once you get to the login screen, hit the Shift key 5 times, and you’ll see an administrator mode command prompt.

Now to reset the password—just type the following command, replacing the username and password with the combination you want:

net user geek MyNewPassword

That’s all there is to it. Now you can login.

Of course, you’ll probably want to put the original sethc.exe file back, which you can do by rebooting into the installation CD, opening the command prompt, and copying the c:\sethc.exe file back to c:\windows\system32\sethc.exe.

How to Recover that Photo, Picture or File You Deleted Accidentally.,…


How to Recover that Photo, Picture or File You Deleted Accidentally.,…
image

Have you ever accidentally deleted a photo on your camera, computer, USB drive, or anywhere else? What you might not know is that you can usually restore those pictures—even from your camera’s memory stick.

Windows tries to prevent you from making a big mistake by providing the Recycle Bin, where deleted files hang around for a while—but unfortunately it doesn’t work for external USB drives, USB flash drives, memory sticks, or mapped drives. Luckily there’s another way to recover deleted files.

Note: we originally wrote this article a year ago, but we’ve received this question so many times from readers, friends, and families that we’ve polished it up and are republishing it for everybody. So far, everybody has reported success!

Restore that File or Photo using Recuva

The first piece of software that you’ll want to try is called Recuva, and it’s extremely easy to use—just make sure when you are installing it, that you don’t accidentally install that stupid Yahoo! toolbar that nobody wants.

Now that you’ve installed the software, and avoided an awful toolbar installation, launch the Recuva wizard and let’s start through the process of recovering those pictures you shouldn’t have deleted.

The first step on the wizard page will let you tell Recuva to only search for a specific type of file, which can save a lot of time while searching, and make it easier to find what you are looking for.

Next you’ll need to specify where the file was, which will obviously be up to wherever you deleted it from. Since I deleted mine from my camera’s SD card, that’s where I’m looking for it.

The next page will ask you whether you want to do a Deep Scan. My recommendation is to not select this for the first scan, because usually the quick scan can find it. You can always go back and run a deep scan a second time.

And now, you’ll see all of the pictures deleted from your drive, memory stick, SD card, or wherever you searched. Looks like what happened in Vegas didn’t stay in Vegas after all…

If there are a really large number of results, and you know exactly when the file was created or modified, you can switch to the advanced view, where you can sort by the last modified time. This can help speed up the process quite a bit, so you don’t have to look through quite as many files.

At this point, you can right-click on any filename, and choose to Recover it, and then save the files elsewhere on your drive. Awesome!

Download Recuva from piriform.com

How to Change Windows 7 Start Orb the Easy Way


Want to make your Windows 7 PC even more unique and personalized?  Then check out this easy guide on how to change your start orb in Windows 7.

Getting Started

First, download the free Windows 7 Start Button Changer (link below), and extract the contents of the folder.  It contains the app along with a selection of alternate start button orbs you can try out.

Before changing the start button, we advise creating a system restore point in case anything goes wrong.  Enter System Restore in your Start menu search, and select “Create a restore point”.

Please note:  We tested this on both the 32 bit and 64 bit editions of Windows 7, and didn’t encounter any problems or stability issues.  That said, it is always prudent to make a restore point just in case a problem did happen.

Click the Create button…

Then enter a name for the restore point, and click Create.

Changing the Start Orb.

Once this is finished, run the Windows 7 Start Button Changer as administrator by right-clicking on it and selecting “Run as administrator”.  Accept the UAC prompt that will appear.

If you don’t run it as an administrator, you may see the following warning.  Click Quit, and then run again as administrator.

You should now see the Windows 7 Start Button Changer.  On the left it shows what your current (default) start orb looks like inactive, when hovered over, and when selected.  Click the orb on the right to select a new start button.

Here we browsed to the sample orbs folder, and selected one of them.  Let’s give Windows the Media Center orb for a start orb.  Click the orb you want, and then select open.

When you click Open, your screen will momentarily freeze and your taskbar will disappear.  When it reappears, your computer will have gone from having the old, default Start orb style…

…to your new, exciting Start orb!  Here it is default, and glowing when hovered over.

 

Now, the Windows 7 Start Orb Changer will change, and show your new Start orb on the left side.  If you would like to revert to the default orb, simply click the folder icon to restore it.  Or, if you would like to change the orb again, restore the original first and then select a new one.

The orbs don’t have to be round; here’s a fancy Windows 7 logo as the start button.

The start orb change will work in the Aero and Aero basic (which Windows 7 Start uses) themes, but will not show up in the classic, Windows 2000 style themes.  Here’s how the new start button looks with the Aero Classic theme:

There are tons of orbs available, including this cute smiley, so choose one that you like to make your computer uniquely yours.

Conclusion

This is a cute way to make your desktop unique, and can be a great way to make a truly personalized theme.  Let us know your favorite Start orb!

Link

Download the Windows 7 Start Button Changer

Find more Start orbs at deviantART