Best Windows 8 Tips For Those Who Don’t Have Touch….


Long live the keyboard and mouse!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Windows 8 Release Preview download is out and available for all to install and, if you’re a regular here at Pocket-lint and of the non-Mac persuasion, it’s well worth doing. In fact, according to Microsoft, it’s even worth doing if you run a Mac.

Now, we’re not saying that Windows 8 is the best thing since sliced wafers. Indeed, according to our own Ian Morris, it’s more like the worst thing since fried Vista, but don’t let that put you off. What might be making you a little uncomfortable is the fact that you don’t have a touchscreen computer. No, most people don’t. Don’t worry. The trouble is, what with Windows 8 and that added Metro interface all built with touch in mind, being stuck with a mouse can be all too much of a drag.

Help is, very literally, at hand though. You have a keyboard and one that’s bursting with shortcuts, ready to get things done far quicker than either a touchscreen or a mouse could. Some are those that you might be familiar with from Windows 7 and some are entirely new, but here are a handful worth remembering to get you started on your journey of learning a new desktop OS.

Spacebar to unlock

There are a few different ways of getting through the lock screen but most of them involve dragging your mouse most of the way across your desk and off the other side if you’re not using a touch PC. Instead, save yourself the bother and a few broken coffee cups by thumping the spacebar instead. It’s also a wonderfully neolithic entrance to what is supposed to be a super-advanced piece of software.

Windows + L = Lock

You’ve unlocked with a swat of your palm, now lock back up again with hardly any more effort. As with the previous version of Windows, you’ll be relieved to see that a trusty Windows + L maneouvre will take you back to the lockscreen again. It certainly beats the mystery of trying to shut your machine down.

More spacebar

Hit the spacebar on the main view of the the Metro UI and you get something resembling a taskbar popping up at the bottom of the screen. It’s not really a taskbar but it does give you some controls over your live tiles which are worth customising as to your needs.

Windows + X = Start Menu

To be fair, it’s not really the Start Menu that you’ll know and love from Windows 7 but it’s as close a thing as you’re going to get. Looking more like the grey, right-click kind of options, you’ll find yourself presented with control panel options, links to programs, task managers, power managers, device information and more. You know, a bit like the Start Menu but with all of the style, design and, yes, life sucked out of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows + Q = Apps

Naturally all that verve and elan from the Start Menu had to be put somewhere. Hit the Windows key and Q to find some of it. What you’ll see is a massive, scrollable and very pretty Metro look at all the apps you’ve installed.

Windows + W = Search

The search function on the old Start Menu may have been fun but now Windows 8 is getting all contextual with search instead. Hit the Windows + W shortcut in any app or screen to bring up a search menu from the right where you can dig away to your heart’s content.

Windows + Z = Context

For even more contextual information, press Windows + Z at the same time. The effect is slightly different depending on which app you’re in at the time but expect tabs and address bars to pop up when browsing and other options from the top and bottom in other areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows + F4 = Close

You know this, or you certainly should. If there’s two Windows shortcuts that you ever picked up, this should be the second and, yes, it still works. More to the point, it’s more important than ever. Microsoft, in its infinite wisdom, has decided to dispense with that little X in the top right corner of windows that allows you to close them. In fairness, the idea is that the computer takes care of it all for you but, if you still find it unnerving that some bits and pieces might be open or running, then just hit that magic Windows + F4 combo to shut them down.

Windows + Tab = Fast Switching

Fast switching is your way to flick between open applications on Windows 8 and you can do that by either using Windows + Tab or Alt + Tab much like on Windows 7. The difference here is that the funky Aero look is lost, in the case of the former, and replaced with a dedicated bar that slides out of the left side of the screen. Fortunately, the Alt + Tab version is better on Windows 8 and cycles between full screen versions of your open applications very smoothly indeed.

Ctrl + Shift + Esc = Task Manager

Another classic from the Windows 7 days is the shortcut to the Task Manager that is Ctrl + Shift + Esc. It’s not always easy to find the familiar parts of an OS that you’re sure must exist when the UI has entirely changed, so it’s good to know that keyboard navigation will still do you proud.

Windows + E = Computer

Feeling like you’ve lost control? Fear not, the Windows + E shortcut still works to snap you straight into the Computer (or what used to be My Computer) window. From there, you’ll be able to get the usual proper picture of how much storage you’ve got left, what devices are plugged into your machine and a decent starting place for exploring your files. E is for explore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windows + . = Cascade

One of the sexier look and feel touches of the Metro UI on Windows 8 is the cascade effect of the application windows. Pressing Windows + . allows you to switch around and cycle through a few of the looks which maximise and marginalise certain windows to present you with a different slant on multitasking.

Windows + H = Share

With social networking and the ever-popular sharing concept in technology, Microsoft has brought a direct sharing technique and shortcut to Windows 8 and the Metro UI. Hit Windows + H on a picture or other such file and a menu slides in from the right offering to share that item on whatever compatible service apps you have installed. Sadly, when we tried it, the only option we got was Mail. Nonetheless, the instant attachment and new message produced made things very quick and easy.

Windows + C = Charms

Another of the big push features and new terms of Windows 8 is the charms. Windows + C slides them in from the right where you can access the very fundamental areas that are Search, Settings, Devices, Sharing and Start. All very key bits and pieces.

Windows + , = Invisible

Aero isn’t completely dead. That little corner rectangle which offered a way of seeing through your applications all the way to the desktop is now repeated by hitting Windows + ,. It’s not wildly useful but it’s a nice way of sticking your head up above the clouds for a moment before diving back into your work.

Let us know in the comments of any non-touch treasures that you did up on your travels..

 

 

 

 

 

 

Linkedin Passwords Hacked Out.:-((


At least 6.4 million passwords were stolen from the site and then leaked on to the internet.

 

NEW YORK: Social media site LinkedIn said on Wednesday that it had suffered a data breach which had compromised the passwords of some of the social network’s members.

LinkedIn engineer Vicente Silveira confirmed on the website’s blogthat some passwords were “compromised.”

“We are continuing to investigate this situation,” he said.

LinkedIn said it sent emails to members whose passwords were affected, explaining how to reset them since they were no longer valid on the site.

LinkedIn, which made its stock debut last year, is a social media company that caters to companies seeking employees and people scouting for jobs. It has more than 161 million members worldwide.

One of the Mountain View, California-based company’s main initiatives is to grow internationally – 61 per cent of its membership is located outside the United States.

Marcus Carey, security researcher at Boston-based Rapid7, said he believed the attackers had been inside LinkedIn’s network for at least several days, based on an analysis of the type of information stolen and quantity of data posted on forums.

“While LinkedIn is investigating the breach, the attackers may still have access to the system,” Carey warned. “If the attackers are still entrenched in the network, then users who have already changed their passwords may have to do so a second time.”

Officials with LinkedIn declined to comment on whether an attack might still be in progress.

The breach is the latest in a string of high-profile hacks affecting companies and governments around the world, which have put the personal information of millions at risk.

News of the breach surfaced on Wednesday when computer security experts said they discovered files with some 6.4 million encrypted passwords on underground websites where criminal hackers frequently exchange stolen information.

Graham Cluley, a senior technology consultant with British computer security software maker Sophos said that it is not yet clear if all of those passwords belong to LinkedIn members.

The files included only passwords and not corresponding email addresses, which means that people who download the files and decrypt, or unscramble, the passwords will not easily be able to access any accounts with compromised passwords.

Yet analysts said it is likely that the hackers who stole the passwords also have the corresponding email addresses and would be able to access the accounts.

Needs more salt?

At least two security experts who examined the files containing the LinkedIn passwords said the company had failed to use best practices for protecting the data.

The experts said that LinkedIn used a vanilla or basic technique for encrypting, or scrambling, the passwords which allowed hackers to quickly unscramble all passwords after they figured out the formula by which any single password had been encrypted.

The social network could have made it extremely tedious for the passwords to be unscrambled by using a technique known as “salting”, which means adding a secret code to each password before it is encrypted.

“What they did is considered to be poor practice,” said Mary Landesman, security researcher with Cloudmark, a company that helps secure messaging systems.

LinkedIn officials declined to comment on the criticism, saying it was discussing the breach only on its official blog.

Silveira said in the blog that the company just recently put in place new security measures to protect customer passwords, including the use of salting techniques.

Last year, a security researcher warned that LinkedIn had flaws in the way it managed communications with browsers to authorize logins, making accounts more vulnerable to attack. The company responded by tightening its procedures for logins.

LinkedIn was co-founded by former PayPal executive Reid Hoffman in 2002 and makes money selling marketing services and subscriptions to companies and job seekers.

LinkedIn shares closed 8 cents higher at $93.08 on Wednesday despite news of the breach.

Gideon Sundback – Google Doodle


Gideon Sundback – Google Doodle: Gideon Sundback (born April 24 1880) was a Swedish-American electrical engineer. Gideon Sundback is most commonly associated with his work in the development of the zipper.

Gideon Sundback was hired to work for the Universal Fastener Company. Good design skills and a marriage to the plant-manager’s daughter Elvira Aronson led Sundback to the position of head designer at Universal.

He was responsible for improving the far from perfect ‘Judson C-curity Fastener.’ Unfortunately, Sundback’s wife died in 1911. The grieving husband busied himself at the design table and by December of 1913, he had designed the modern zipper.

Gideon Sundback increased the number of fastening elements from four per inch to ten or eleven, had two facing-rows of teeth that pulled into a single piece by the slider, and increased the opening for the teeth guided by the slider.

The patent for the ‘Separable Fastener’ was issued in 1917. Sundback also created the manufacturing machine for the new zipper. Within the first year of operation, Sundback’s zipper-making machinery was producing a few hundred feet of fastener per day.

Three Different Styles Of Windows 8, Windows 8 Pro and Windows RT


We’ve known for what feels like ages that Windows 8 would come in at least two flavors: one supporting x86 devices and one for ARM machines. Now Microsoft’s ready to put a naming scheme on its much-anticipated menu for the operating system. According to a post on the Windows blog, ARM devices will get Windows RT, while x86 / 64 devices will run Windows 8 and Windows 8 Pro (also for x86 devices) will offer the suit-and-tie set added features for “encryption, virtualization, PC management and domain connectivity.” Windows Media Center will be packaged as an add-on for the folks who go Pro. For a full break down of what each version will hold hit the source link below and check out our hands-on impressions of the OS preview here.

 

 

Comment plz

Here’s How Windows 8 Will Create a Singular User Experience Across Different Screen Sizes


 

Microsoft has been adamant that design is central to the development of Windows 8, and early builds have proven that to be true. But so far, we’ve only really seen Windows 8 on a couple devices, and Microsoft promises the Metro experience will be uniform regardless of screen size or form factor. But how?

In yet another sprawling MSDN essay written by UX program manager, David Washington, there are three areas that will prove key in Microsoft’s quest to accomplish this feat: adaptive layout frameworks, auto-scaling varying pixel densities, and support for scalable vector graphics.

Adaptive Layouts

Microsoft’s use of CSS3 and XAML, which will allow developers to section off apps into pre-defined modules which can be rearranged on the fly. This will ensure that content will fit on a screen that’s 1024 pixels wide, or 2560 pixels wide. This also means app developers will need to consider these factors from the first moment they start working on an app.

Pixel Density Auto-Scaling

When you increase pixel density, things become very small on the screen unless you magnify it a little bit. Instead of offering more screen real-estate, on-screen assets instead become higher-fidelity. Microsoft is able to accomplish this on different screen sizes and resolutions by lumping displays into three categories—standard, HD, and quad-XGA—and establishing scale factors.

Many Windows 8 tablet PCs will have pixel densities of at least 135 DPI – much higher than many of us are used to. Of course we’ve seen the introduction of HD tablets with Full HD 1920×1080 resolution on an 11.6″ screen, with a pixel density of 190 DPI or quad-XGA tablets with 2560×1440 on the same 11.6″ screen; that’s a pixel density of 253 DPI. Pixel densities can increase even more on lesser aspect ratios and smaller screens as we see in the new iPad. As the pixel density increases, the physical size of objects on screen gets smaller. If Windows wasn’t built to accommodate different pixel densities, objects on screen would be too small to easily tap or read on these tablets.

For those who buy these higher pixel-density screens, we want to ensure that their apps, text, and images will look both beautiful and usable on these devices. Early on, we explored continuous scaling to the pixel density, which would maintain the size of an object in inches, but we found that most apps use bitmap images, which could look blurry when scaled up or down to an unpredictable size. Instead, Windows 8 uses predictable scale percentages to ensure that Windows will look great on these devices. There are three scale percentages in Windows 8:

100% when no scaling is applied
140% for HD tablets
180% for quad-XGA tablets

Scalable Vector Graphics

Native support for scalable vector graphics will make it easy for developers to create assets that can adjust on-the-fly to varying resolutions and pixel densities without any additional coding from developers. If a developer doesn’t want to mess with SVG files, they can also save multiple images of the same file for the app to call on depending on screen size, or use CSS3 commands, which will automatically resize a file. Either way, it ensures an app will look the same regardless of screen size.

All in all, Microsoft has some smart ideas at play here, and it will be interesting to see how developers embrace these when Windows 8 hits the masses at the end of the year. [Microsoft]

Here’s How Windows 8 Will Create a Singular User Experience Across Different Screen Sizes


 

Microsoft has been adamant that design is central to the development of Windows 8, and early builds have proven that to be true. But so far, we’ve only really seen Windows 8 on a couple devices, and Microsoft promises the Metro experience will be uniform regardless of screen size or form factor. But how?

In yet another sprawling MSDN essay written by UX program manager, David Washington, there are three areas that will prove key in Microsoft’s quest to accomplish this feat: adaptive layout frameworks, auto-scaling varying pixel densities, and support for scalable vector graphics.

Adaptive Layouts

Microsoft’s use of CSS3 and XAML, which will allow developers to section off apps into pre-defined modules which can be rearranged on the fly. This will ensure that content will fit on a screen that’s 1024 pixels wide, or 2560 pixels wide. This also means app developers will need to consider these factors from the first moment they start working on an app.

Pixel Density Auto-Scaling

When you increase pixel density, things become very small on the screen unless you magnify it a little bit. Instead of offering more screen real-estate, on-screen assets instead become higher-fidelity. Microsoft is able to accomplish this on different screen sizes and resolutions by lumping displays into three categories—standard, HD, and quad-XGA—and establishing scale factors.

Many Windows 8 tablet PCs will have pixel densities of at least 135 DPI – much higher than many of us are used to. Of course we’ve seen the introduction of HD tablets with Full HD 1920×1080 resolution on an 11.6″ screen, with a pixel density of 190 DPI or quad-XGA tablets with 2560×1440 on the same 11.6″ screen; that’s a pixel density of 253 DPI. Pixel densities can increase even more on lesser aspect ratios and smaller screens as we see in the new iPad. As the pixel density increases, the physical size of objects on screen gets smaller. If Windows wasn’t built to accommodate different pixel densities, objects on screen would be too small to easily tap or read on these tablets.

For those who buy these higher pixel-density screens, we want to ensure that their apps, text, and images will look both beautiful and usable on these devices. Early on, we explored continuous scaling to the pixel density, which would maintain the size of an object in inches, but we found that most apps use bitmap images, which could look blurry when scaled up or down to an unpredictable size. Instead, Windows 8 uses predictable scale percentages to ensure that Windows will look great on these devices. There are three scale percentages in Windows 8:

100% when no scaling is applied
140% for HD tablets
180% for quad-XGA tablets

Scalable Vector Graphics

Native support for scalable vector graphics will make it easy for developers to create assets that can adjust on-the-fly to varying resolutions and pixel densities without any additional coding from developers. If a developer doesn’t want to mess with SVG files, they can also save multiple images of the same file for the app to call on depending on screen size, or use CSS3 commands, which will automatically resize a file. Either way, it ensures an app will look the same regardless of screen size.

All in all, Microsoft has some smart ideas at play here, and it will be interesting to see how developers embrace these when Windows 8 hits the masses at the end of the year. [Microsoft]

Browser Wars: Chrome vs. IE9 vs. Firefox (C P Material by Michael Muchmore)


 

 

 

You really can’t go wrong with any Web browser choice these days. Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari, all are fast, standards compliant, and feature rich. A lot boils down to what you’re comfortable with and which features are most important to you. For many people, the choice is moving to the product offered their favorite search site. The last time we compared all five major Web browsers Google Chrome had just over 12 percent of the market. That’s now doubled, and it looks like Chrome’s market share will pass Firefox’s soon.

 

  • SPEED

I’d like to think the reason for this was my awarding Chrome the PCMag Editors’ Choice, but there are other possible good reasons for Chrome’s rise. Foremost among them is speed. Links to download the browser on the leading search site, and bundles with PC makers doesn’t hurt either. But Chrome adds a few compelling features all its own: Chrome Instant means you’ll often see your page before you’ve even finished typing its address or title. And it’s the only browser with a built-in Flash player and PDF reader.

 

But Chrome doesn’t have a monopoly on unique features or speed. Internet Explorer 9 brought Microsoft’s fading browser a need boost, with JavaScript speed comparable to Chrome, and even started its own performance improving trend—graphics hardware acceleration. Now Firefox and Chrome come along with their own graphics hardware acceleration, and other browsers will surely follow. But IE still offers some distinguishing points, most of which come from its close integration with Windows 7. (IE 9 and up will only run on Windows 7 or Vista.) Pinned sites is a big one. This lets users keep a permanent button for a site in the taskbar, which opens a browser with the site’s own branding, rather than IEs.

 

Sync
While many browsers offer ability to sync your bookmarks, settings, and history Firefox offers perhaps the strongest, even syncing with its mobile Android version. I’ve often been shocked to come home to a PC, fire up the browser, and see the exact same group of tabs I’d left at work. Speaking of Tabs, Firefox offers one of the most innovative way to organize lots of tabs, with its Panorama tab-grouping feature. Lately, Firefox has made progress in startup time and memory usage, longstanding complaints.

Perhaps the most innovative browser of all over the years has been the Norwegian-made Opera. Opera introduce a good many of the standard features we take for granted—built-in search, popup blocking, and even tabs themselves. Recently, Amazon has taken a page from Opera by emulating Opera Mini and Opera Turbo’s Web caching speedup. Opera’s bag of tricks include Unite—which actually turns your browser into a Web server, so that you can host your photos, or even a chat. Lately, the Nordic company has added live tiles on its Speed Dial new-tab page, not unlike those to be featured in Windows 8.

Style
And don’t rule out Apple’s Safari in your browser shopping. Though this browser is mostly associated with Mac OS, the stylish tech company makes a Windows version, too. Only Safari offers a Reader view, which lets you focus on the text of publication styles sites. More recently, Apple’s added a Reading List feature, which saves sites you want to peruse later. Safari also sports Apple’s trademark design prowess, particularly in its Top Sites gallery new-tab page and its Cover Flow view of your history and bookmarks.

Standards
Other things you’ll want to take into consideration when choosing a browser include support for HTML5 and Privacy. Both of these are moving targets, with Chrome leading the pack on the first and Internet Explorer on the latter, with its Tracking Protection. In the reviews below, you’ll see appraisals of how each player performs in these areas, along with several different types of speed tests and detailed feature analyses. But remember, don’t be afraid to try the browsers out for yourself—they’re all a free download away!

Google ChromeGoogle Chrome 15

Chrome Instant means your Web page is ready to read before you finish typing the address. This, its speed, minimalist design, and advanced support for HTML5 have deservedly been attracting more and more users to the browser. New hardware acceleration makes Chrome a speed maven at any task.

 

SetupFirefox 8

Firefox 4 got Mozilla back into the game, and the versions keep coming at a much faster clip, now that Mozilla hews to a Chrome-like rapid release schedule. These frequent versions haven’t brought the kind of earth-shattering changes we used to see in new full-number Firefox updates, but the development teams have tackled issues of importance to a lot of Web users—startup time, memory use, and of course security. This lean, fast, customizable browser can hold its own against any competitor, and it offers graphics hardware acceleration.

 

Windows Internet Explorer 9 Beta: Developer ToolsInternet Explorer 9 (IE9)

Microsoft’s latest browser is faster, trimmer, more compliant with HTML5—a major improvement over its predecessor. It also brings some unique capabilities like tab-pinning and hardware acceleration, but only Windows 7 and Vista users need apply.

 

Opera 11Opera 11.5

Like the other current browsers Opera is fast, compliant with HTML5, and spare of interface. Long an innovator, recently it’s added unique things like Unite, which turns the browser into a server, and Turbo, which speeds up the Web on slow connections through caching. Extension support actually followed other browsers, but Oslo still innovates with tab stacking, visual mouse gestures, and live Speed Dial tiles.

 

Apple Safari 5 : Full Page ZoomSafari 5

Safari is a fast, beautiful browser, but the Reader view and Reading List makes it even more enticing. Leading support for HTML 5 features will also be important, but you can already get that in other browsers, too. Safari’s gorgeous styling, strong bookmarking, RSS reader, and vivid new-tab page will also appeal to many.

what is the difference between Core 2 Duo and Pentium Dual Core …..


Core 2 Duo Vs Pentium Dual Core


What is the main difference between budget CPU (Pentium Dual Core) vs premium CPU (Core 2 Duo)?

Some of you might still wondering, either it is a smart choice to fork out another RM 200 to get C2D with equivalent gigahertz. Well, the truth is, both CPU are 95 % identical, which the other 5% reserve to C2D processor has higher L2 Cache size. Thats it.

Core 2 Duo processor has 2, 3, 4 or even 6 MB Cache, depend on the product code. The cheapest C2D has 2 MB cache, which around RM 400 right now. Compare to Pentium Dual Core, which has 1 MB cache, you might think, C2D is a better choice. However, think again when you see Pentium Dual Core will only cost you merely RM 200. (RM 200 cheaper to C2D same GHz)

From various benchmark, having extra 1 MB cache might improve the performance of the CPU up to 10%, depend on application. But, C2D processor will cost you another 100 percent increase ( base on Pentium Dual Core price)

However, C2D currently running on 800, 1066 and 1333 FSB. Compare to Pentium Dual Core, it is limited to FSB 800 only. For me, this limitation is an advantage for Pentium Dual Core. Mainly, because we can overclock it to 1333 MHz FSB without any much problem, since most of current mobo run at 1333 MHz without any complain. But for most user who dont give a damn about overclocking, having faster FSB might improve their system responsiveness.

Link : See how Tomshardware overclock Pentium Dual Core 1.6 GHz to unbelievable 3.5 GHz without any exotic cooler. : HERE

Bear in mind, Pentum Dual Core is not Pentium D or Pentium 4 D. Pentium Dual Core is totally different CPU compare to Pentium 4. So, why the heck they name it Pentium Dual Core if the architecture of Pentium Dual Core equivalent to Core 2 Duo?

Simple, marketing gimmick. Intel want to separate premium segment CPU, midle segment and cheap segment CPU. C2D will represent intel CPU for premium segment, Pentium Dual Core to fight direcly with cheap AMD Athlon 64 x2 CPU and Celeron is targeted to fight Sempron.

So, back to the question. Is it worth to add another RM200 to get C2D which has same frequency with Pentium Dual Core? NO..it is not. Unless you go for 6 MB Cache Core 2 Duo processor, clocking at 3 GHz (8000 series) which will cost you around RM 600.00

Quote from Tomshardware :

The Pentium Dual-Core models E2140 and E2160 as well as the newer additions E2180 and E2200 all possess a full-fledged Core 2 Duo core that has only been pared down in two respects, allowing Intel to sell a low-cost part. For one thing, it only comes with 1 MB instead of 4 MB, for another, it is limited to a maximum clock speed of 2 GHz on an 800 MHz FSB.

Price List : PCZone PDF price list

Tomshardware Benchmark : Does cache really improve performance : HERE

Windows 7 vs Windows 8 (Who will win)


Now I am going to share some information about comparison b/w windows 7 vs windows…

let’s see who will win☺.

For the last few days I’d been scratching my head, measuring windows 8 performance and m

 

aking notes on it. After 5 days of extensive research I came up with some stats, then compared it with my new windows 7 system.

As expected, Windows 8 developer preview was far ahead than Windows 7 in terms of booting, features, performance and in every other aspects.

Lets have a face-to-face comparison between Windows 7 and Windows 8 operating system and where they stand against each other,

 

Installation Time

Improved GUI and increased features showed its toll as installation time of windows 8 was a bit more than windows 7. It takes somewhere close to 29 minutes as compared to 22 minutes takes by windows 7. On installation with pen drive, it was 14 minutes and 10 minutes, respectively. Windows installation using pen drive is faster than doing the same with CD.

Booting Time

This is lightning, Windows 8 took just 8 seconds to boot as compared to windows 7 that took~20 seconds for cold booting. The reason: actually, Windows 8 never shuts down rather it saves its status and powers-off, its more like hibernation rather than shutting down. It has a clear advantage in terms of booting when compared to Windows 7 operating system.

GUI

Graphics has always been a trademark of windows operating systems. Windows 8 sees further improvement in GUI with metro-style interface and tile based startup. Also, Semantic Zoom in windows 8 gives you the freedom to use it like a smartphone, with two fingers by pinching to show and hide stuffs. In addition, the feature of stock ticker file will notify you about the latest status of your chosen shares.

Performance

Despite having a heavier GUI, performance of Windows 8 is great. To start Photoshop CS5.5, it took just 4 seconds as compared to Windows 7 that took as long as 9s to start it. The same is with Nero 12, which took 14s and 6 seconds, respectively. This is feature stamps the superiority of windows 8 over windows 7.

CPU Performance

When I compared the engine, I mean CPU performance of both OSes I found a marginal improvement in windows 8. For running a program on Windows 8, there was marginally lesser load on CPU than when it ran on Windows 7. This is a significant achievement as improved GUI puts more load on CPU, despite that its performance is improving rather than deteriorating.

Shutdown time

The story closes at a fast note too, my Windows 8 system shut down just in 6 seconds. This is amazing when compared to Windows 7 that took somewhere close to 12 seconds and my old, deary windows XP that takes a lifetime to shutdown.

In our comparison between Windows 8 and Windows 7 OS, former is a clear winner by a big margin. But before you support my claim better you should experience windows 8 developer preview by yourself.

Being a developer preview, presently its in testing phase, so try it with Virtual Box to make sure your system  remains safe if anything goes bad.

Thanks:

i have to say that it’s just a share to written by myself ♥

 

 

Windows 8’s Me…


Windows 8’s Metro UI: Some things You May Just Hate

THE BRIGHTLY COLORED, INTERACTIVE TILES OF WINDOWS 8’S METRO INTERFACE ARE FUN AND INNOVATIVE. BUT THEY CAN ALSO BE FRUSTRATING AND COMPLETELY UNINTUITIVE TO USE.

by : Shan M Salem
 
As everybody knows, the most striking thing about Windows 8 is its Metro interface–those brightly colored tiles that serve as both shortcuts to programs and live widgets reporting data from those programs.
The interface has been widely praised around the Web, and for good reason. It’s a bold innovation (especially coming from a company that’s normally so timid), it looks great, and it makes getting around Windows a lot more fun.
But in the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, at least, Metro is as annoying as it is innovative, especially if you attempt to use it with a keyboard and mouse instead of with a touchscreen. Among other problems, its shortcuts are difficult to use, it disappears without warning, and it makes any attempt to change settings on your PC a scavenger hunt.Image
Image
It’s important to remember that the Consumer Preview isn’t final code, and Microsoft will–I hope–fix many of the problems that now afflict the OS before it releases its final product. But if you’re thinking about downloading the preview version, you ought to know about these problems. And unfortunately, some of the issues are so fundamental that I wonder whether Microsoft can come up with satisfactory fixes for them in the upcoming months.
(One caveat before I begin: I’m basing my criticisms on my experience using Windows 8 Consumer Preview on a dual-monitor desktop. My colleagues who have spent hands-on time with the OS on a Samsung tablet tell me, not surprisingly, that many of the problems I encountered didn’t arise on the touch device. ♥
 
Gifted by at 03:55